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Michigan edges closer to legal sports betting and igaming

first_img Michigan’s Senate is expected to pass bills to legalise sports wagering and online gaming later today (11 December), after the Regulatory Reform Committee gave its approval to a number of amendments to each piece of legislation.As changes have been made to the bills, following expected Senate approval, they will both be sent to the House for concurrence. If the House agrees to the amendments, the bills will then progress forward to Governor Gretchen Whitmer for signature.House Bill 4916, also known as the Lawful Sports Betting Act, has been amended so operators that secure a licence in the state would be subject to lower tax rates than initially proposed.The amended sports wagering bill states that Michigan would place an 8.4% tax on gross revenue from sports bets, down from the 8.75% previously stated.Read the full story on iGB North America.Image: Lovemykia Michigan’s Senate is expected to pass bills to legalise sports wagering and online gaming later today (11 December), after the Regulatory Reform Committee gave its approval to a number of amendments to each piece of legislation. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Legal & compliance Email Address Michigan edges closer to legal sports betting and igaming Topics: Legal & compliance Sports betting Regions: US Michigan 11th December 2019 | By contenteditor Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Tags: Online Gamblinglast_img read more

500.com completes acquisition of majority stake in Loto Interactive

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter In addition, 500.com said it will now make a cash offer for the cancellation of all options of Loto Interactive, again in accordance with the Hong Kong Code on Takeovers and Mergers. 1st April 2021 | By Robert Fletcher The acquisition was made via a share subscription, with 500.com purchasing a total of 169,354,839 shares at a price of HK$0.62 per share, as per a deal agreed in January. Chinese lottery provider 500.com has finalised its acquisition of a majority stake in Loto Interactive, purchasing 169,354,839 shares in the solutions business for HK105.0m (£98.0m/€11.5m/US$13.5m). In relation to the subscription, Loto Interactive has completed its acquisition of the remaining equity interests in indirectly held subsidiary Ganzi Changhe Hydropower Consumption Service Co. Tags: 500.com Loto Interactive 500.com completes acquisition of majority stake in Loto Interactive Subscribe to the iGaming newslettercenter_img M&A Loto Interactive purchased the interests from two sellers for a consideration of approximately $104.4m, increasing its ownership of Ganzi Changhe to 100%. Topics: Strategy M&A 500.com now holds a 54.3% ownership interest in Loto Interactive, increasing its existing holding from 33.7%. Regions: Asia Pursuant to the Hong Kong Code on Takeovers and Mergers, 500.com will now be required to make a cash offer to acquire all the remaining shares of Loto Interactive at $0.75 per share. Email Addresslast_img read more

Don’t waste your ISA! I’d invest £10K in the worst FTSE 100 stock market crash since 1987

first_img Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Harvey Jones | Sunday, 5th April, 2020 “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Enter Your Email Address Harvey Jones has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Hikma Pharmaceuticals and Imperial Brands. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Today is your last chance to use this year’s £20k Stocks and Shares ISA allowance. As the FTSE 100 is suffering the worst stock market crash since 1987, some of you may be wary. If I had £10k at my disposal, or even a smaller sum like £2k or £5k, I would take advantage of today’s massive buying opportunity. History shows that a stock market crash like this one can prove a brilliant time to pick up cut-price FTSE 100 shares.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…If you plan to hold them for the long term, they can quickly recover from short-term setbacks like this one, and deliver income and growth for decades afterwards. That will be free of all tax, if you buy inside a Stocks and Shares ISA.Last call for your Stocks and Shares ISAToday is 5 April, the final day of the 2019–20 tax year. So there is no time to lose.If you already have a investment platform, you can log on and inject extra funds with a debit card. Otherwise you could register with a new platform, if you have your debit card and National Insurance number to hand.Time is of the essence, as the clock ticks towards midnight. If you do not use this year’s ISA allowance, you have lost it for good. You don’t have to invest the maximum £20k, but investing something is always better than investing nothing.Profit from the stock market crashYou really don’t want to waste this stock market crash. The FTSE 100 is down by more than a quarter, so many top companies are trading at bargain valuations, judged by traditional metrics.Given the uncertainty surrounding the travel sector, I would personally avoid stocks like easyJet or British Airways owner International Consolidated Airlines Group, as there is just too much we don’t know right now.However, you could hunt through the FTSE 100 for more secure opportunities. Insurer Phoenix Group Holdings looks relatively solid to me. As do delivery firm Ocado Group and generic drugs manufacturer Hikma Pharmaceuticals. Tobacco giants British American Tobacco and Imperial Tobacco should be resilient.You may have some FTSE 100 ideas of your own. If not, you could play safe, and buy a FTSE 100 tracker instead.1987 stock market crash was a great time to buyThe worst-ever stock market crash was in October 1987, when the FTSE 100 fell 23% in two days, and 36% overall. Investors who screwed up their courage and bought at the bottom were amply rewarded, as it recovered all of those losses within two years, then powered on.We do not know how soon the stock market crash will bottom out. Things look gloomy today, but could brighten quickly, as governments belatedly get a grip. Investors who buy FTSE 100 equities inside a Stocks and Shares ISA now could be nicely placed when the rebound comes.At the very least, shift over some money to secure your allowance, then take advantage of share buying opportunities in the week ahead.center_img Don’t waste your ISA! I’d invest £10K in the worst FTSE 100 stock market crash since 1987 I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Image source: Getty Images See all posts by Harvey Joneslast_img read more

Where will the Rolls-Royce share price go in June?

first_img See all posts by Alan Oscroft Where will the Rolls-Royce share price go in June? I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Alan Oscroft | Monday, 31st May, 2021 | More on: RR FREE REPORT: Why this £5 stock could be set to surge Are you on the lookout for UK growth stocks?If so, get this FREE no-strings report now.While it’s available: you’ll discover what we think is a top growth stock for the decade ahead.And the performance of this company really is stunning.In 2019, it returned £150million to shareholders through buybacks and dividends.We believe its financial position is about as solid as anything we’ve seen.Since 2016, annual revenues increased 31%In March 2020, one of its senior directors LOADED UP on 25,000 shares – a position worth £90,259Operating cash flow is up 47%. (Even its operating margins are rising every year!)Quite simply, we believe it’s a fantastic Foolish growth pick.What’s more, it deserves your attention today.So please don’t wait another moment. Alan Oscroft has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Get the full details on this £5 stock now – while your report is free.center_img Rolls-Royce (LSE: RR) has had one of the rockiest rides of the pandemic. Rolls has been up and down so far in 2021, going nowhere really in May. And we’re still looking at a fall of more than 60% over the past two years.Now, I’m going to say right up front, I’ve no idea where the Rolls-Royce share price is going to go in June. But we’re heading for developments that should affect the longer term. And I still can’t work out whether to buy Rolls-Royce shares as a recovery pick.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…For one, the next step in pandemic opening up is scheduled for 21 June. On that day, the government has pencilled in the removal of the final legal restrictions on social and business movements. Saying that, there’s that Indian variant thing. And the Prime Minister has already said we might have to wait a bit longer to get our full freedoms back. Further delays could see the Rolls-Royce share price weaken in June.Still, the opening up that we’re already enjoying is having its effect. In particular, sun-seekers are heading for the beaches again. And some travel-related shares are recovering. International Consolidated Airlines shares are up 26% so far in 2021, with easyJet not far behind with a 21% gain. TUI hasn’t had such a good year so far though, dropping a few percent. And the Rolls-Royce share price is down 4%.Rolls-Royce share price driversIt’s probably going to be a while before the travel sector recovery feeds through to Rolls-Royce. It’ll take time before engine maintenance requirements start to ramp up again. The other critical thing is that Rolls-Royce suffered big loss in 2020, and needed a major financial rescue package.There’s still cash on the books to keep the aerospace engineer going for a while yet. But will it be enough to last until profits return?The uncertainty behind that question must, surely, weigh heavily on the Rolls-Royce share price for at least a few months yet. At full-year results time, Rolls wasn’t in a position to make much in the way of predictions. That’s not surprising, as the company spoke of the uncertainties of the near- and medium-term outlook for civil aviation.It’s all about cashAnd we shouldn’t expect the cash situation to reverse in the current year. With those results, Rolls said it expects free cash flow to turn positive in the second half of 2021. But it still expects to suffer a free cash outflow of around £2bn for the full year.The company is hoping for positive free cash flow in 2022 of at least £750m. But that depends critically on the pace of recovery in flying hours, and the success of the firm’s cost-cutting strategy.I’m keenly awaiting first-half results due on 5 August. Any updates on the expected cash flow situation could drive the Rolls-Royce share price in either direction. In the meantime, any positive news from the aviation business in June and beyond would be welcome.I’m not buying yet. I’m going to wait for the clouds of uncertainty to clear a bit. Enter Your Email Address Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Image source: Getty Images last_img read more

RIP: The Rev. Gary P. Fertig

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis October 17, 2014 at 8:14 pm They each were an integral part of helping me find the God I continue to seek. Both Gary & John taught me to be open and to explore and to know the love and joy that came with being an Episcopalian. It is hard to conceive however, that Gary is gone at such young age. I so agree with Marilyn Finklea, that the tears are what we are left with for the loss of both these exceptional priests. October 19, 2014 at 1:00 pm Truly a loss for the Episcopal Church. Stranger still is that Bishop Tom Shaw died around the same time! May the rest in peace and rise in glory! Danielle A, Gaherty says: Submit a Job Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Livingston Prescott Humboldt IV says: October 8, 2014 at 5:00 pm A fine priest and a fine man. I remember him well from St. Thomas. Rest eternal. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Bath, NC Comments (8) October 10, 2014 at 7:52 pm There are no words….Just tears. May he rest in peace and rise in Glory. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Albany, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments are closed. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Jeremiah J. de Michaelis says: October 27, 2014 at 12:59 pm Fr. Fertig was a marvelous priest who graciously consented to officiate at my wedding to Alice Preston Hord in 1986. We had decided to elope to NYC ( after much advanced planning), so officiating for two strangers was something he needn’t have done. We always appreciated his kindness and pray for the repose of his soul. May he rest in peace and rise in glory with the saints. J de M The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Rev. Gary P. Fertig, rector of The Church of The Ascension in Chicago until his retirement in 2012, has died aged 62.A former vicar of Saint Thomas Fifth Avenue in New York and teacher at the choir school, Fertig was a graduate of Nashotah House Seminary.Fertig will be buried in Ann Arbor, Michigan on Friday, Oct. 10 at 10 a.m. A Requiem Mass will be said by the Rev. David Cobb, rector of Ascension, at 7:30 a.m. on Oct. 10, prior to Fertig’s burial.A notice from Church of the Ascension is available here. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Smithfield, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem RIP: The Rev. Gary P. Fertig M. E. Finklea says: center_img Obituary, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET People Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Revd Canon Dr Huntingdon Willmott Faversham-Greaves LXIII says: Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA Livingston Prescott Humboldt IV says: Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Tags Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL December 27, 2014 at 1:10 am He was the first priest to whom I confessed my spiritual doubts and personal pains and difficulties as a young teen-aged girl some 36 years ago, when he, as a very young man, served at Saint Thomas’s Episcopal Church in Manhattan. When he was re-assigned to serve in the mid-west, never to return to NYC, I missed him tremendously. He was a fine man with great moral integrity and a totally dedicated brother. I was so happy when just two years ago, I sent him a Christmas card, in which I wrote an update of my life directly to his Chicago location. He wrote me back, overjoyed- thanking me for my letter and telling me of how he had never forgotten me. He also mentioned that he had “health problems”, but I hoped that he was going to be alright. I now know that I have lost one of the greatest friends I ever had. Posted Oct 8, 2014 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Events Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group October 17, 2014 at 5:55 pm Interesting that he and Fr. Andrew died a few days apart. Two great priests! Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Monique Emilyne Thomas says: last_img read more

New Zealand claim Rugby World Cup 7s title to secure double triumph

first_imgMonday Jul 23, 2018 New Zealand claim Rugby World Cup 7s title to secure double triumph New Zealand’s Sevens team have become the first team to win the Rugby World Cup Sevens title for the third time after they beat England 33-12 in the final in San Francisco on Sunday. This adds to the success of the Women’s team, who were also victorious. Tournament favourites South Africa and Fiji both exited at the semi final stage, knocked out by England and New Zealand respectively. They went on to play for third place, with the Blitzbokke taking that honour by beating Fiji 24-19.New Zealand’s win sees the country picking up an unprecedented double-double, as both All Blacks Sevens and the Black Ferns won for the second RWC tournament in succession.“The double is huge, both the men and women train in the same place and they put pressure on us by winning their final,” said Tim Mikkelson, co-captin.“We knew coming in it was going to be tough. We nearly got knocked out by France but raised it against Fiji. Credit to the coaching staff, the coach brought the boys together. We didn’t get the results but we kept on working.”Scott Curry, named AIG Player of the Final, was delighted with his team’s performance. “It’s amazing, very hard to put into words. I’m so proud of the boys’ efforts over the weekend – we had four really tough games. Credit to England, who played really well.”Head of England Sevens, Simon Amor, was naturally disappointed, but proud.“It’s obviously disappointing to have missed out on that top spot but we made a few too many errors and turned the ball over too many times against a very good New Zealand team.“I’m delighted with the way that the guys performed right the way through the tournament – they came through some really close games and played some outstanding rugby.“This marks the end of a very long year but I’m really pleased with the way that we’ve grown as a programme and how the players have grown as well.”New Zealand were previously RWC Sevens champions in 2001 and 2013 while England were looking for their first title since winning the first edition of the competition at Murrayfield in 1993.New Zealand celebrated with a traditional post victory HakaCatch up on the Quarter Finals from Day Twocredit: worldrugbyADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Sevens Related Articles 66 WEEKS AGO Part three of the award winning USA 7s documentary… 107 WEEKS AGO Table topping Fiji fly past Australia to… 114 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Touching jersey ceremony for young… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingWrinkle Remedy Stuns TV Judges: Forget Surgery, Do This Once DailySmart Life Reports10 Types of Women You Should Never MarryNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

Two Wooden Towers / Sonja Hohengasser & Juergen Wirnsberger

first_imgArchDaily Two Wooden Towers / Sonja Hohengasser & Juergen Wirnsberger Photographs:  Christian Brandstaetter Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project Year:  ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/867699/two-wooden-towers-sonja-hohengasser-and-juergen-wirnsberger Clipboard Manufacturers: Starmann, Stora EnsoSave this picture!© Christian BrandstaetterRecommended ProductsWoodTechnowoodPergola SystemsWoodParklex International S.L.Wood cladding – FacadeResidential ApplicationsFastmount®Heavy Duty Panel Fastener at ‘Sandboxes’ HouseWoodEGGERLaminatesText description provided by the architects. New housing developments suffer from a lack of living quality. There are no similarities – neither form nor orientation and material and also no place for community. Autistic buildings arise in total separation and without relationship. These buildings ignore our most precious value – the landscape – it is mistreated by them.Save this picture!© Christian BrandstaetterSpaceOur answer to the request for a semi-detached house were given with two similar towers standing near each other and creating a space – in front and in between. The building site is defined by the building restriction line and the definition of the maximum height. It is an experiment to create public space in this area of privacy – qualities known from old villages.A familiar togetherness instead of the anonymous side by side.Save this picture!© Christian BrandstaetterOrganisationThe two tower houses are organised in 4 floors.Cellar: wellness area, technicGround floor: sleeping areaSave this picture!Floor PlanFirst floor: cooking and living areaAttic: viewSave this picture!© Christian BrandstaetterVertical circulation is organised by a very compact core and a hydraulic ramp for barrier-free usage.Save this picture!SectionConstructionThe two wooden towers are founded on a common concrete base. They are built of CLT (cross-laminated-timber) plates.Save this picture!© Christian BrandstaetterAll constructive elements, doors and interiors are built with spruce windows and floors are built with larch. The sun-protecting lamellae are made of pine-wood. All wooden surfaces are completely untreated!Save this picture!© Christian BrandstaetterProject gallerySee allShow lessHow Artificial Intelligence Helped to Create a Gaudí-Inspired Thinking SculptureArchitecture NewsWhen Ivory Towers Were Black: Sharon Sutton on the Dual Fronts of Gender and EthnicityArchitecture News Share CopyHouses•Pörtschach am Wörthersee, Austria 2016 Save this picture!© Christian Brandstaetter+ 17 Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/867699/two-wooden-towers-sonja-hohengasser-and-juergen-wirnsberger Clipboard Photographscenter_img Area:  172 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Projects Austria “COPY” Two Wooden Towers / Sonja Hohengasser & Juergen WirnsbergerSave this projectSaveTwo Wooden Towers / Sonja Hohengasser & Juergen Wirnsberger Houses Architects: Sonja Hohengasser & Juergen Wirnsberger Area Area of this architecture project “COPY” CopyAbout this officeSonja Hohengasser & Juergen WirnsbergerOfficeFollowProductWood#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesPörtschach am WörtherseeAustriaPublished on March 23, 2017Cite: “Two Wooden Towers / Sonja Hohengasser & Juergen Wirnsberger” 23 Mar 2017. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogSinkshansgroheBathroom Mixers – Metropol ClassicVinyl Walls3MVinyl Finish – DI-NOC™ Abrasion ResistantPartitionsSkyfoldChoosing the Skyfold Wall for Your SpaceCarpetsB&B ItaliaCarpet – TwistBeams / PillarsLunawoodThermowood Frames and BearersMembranesEffisusHow to use Fire Protection MembranesSoftware / CoursesSculptformSpecification Tool – Price and Spec AppFittingsHOPPEFloor Spring – AR2950DoorsLinvisibileLinvisibile FILO 10 Vertical Pivot Door | BrezzaWood Boards / HPL PanelsInvestwoodViroc Nature for False Ceilings and FlooringFiber Cements / CementsDuctal®Textured PanelAcousticConwedAcoustic Panels – Eurospan®More products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

EU urged to adopt targeted sanctions against Issaias on eve of independence day

first_img Organisation May 23, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 EU urged to adopt targeted sanctions against Issaias on eve of independence day EritreaAfrica April 14, 2021 Find out more On the eve of the 16th anniversary of Eritrea’s independence tomorrow, Reporters Without Borders calls on the European Union to rethink its policy towards what is one of the world’s most repressive and impenetrable countries and, in particular, to adopt targeted sanctions against President Issaias Afeworki.The press freedom organisation finds it incomprehensible that, for example, Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe and Belarusian President Alexandre Lukashenko are banned from the EU but one of Africa’s most brutal dictators was recently received by the European Commission which, moreover, declared itself “very, very honoured” by his visit.“Aside from reflecting a double standard, the EU’s new policy towards Eritrea is disastrous for those who are exposed to the government’s terror and the 13 journalists who disappeared into Eritrean detention centres in 2001,” Reporters Without Borders said. “It is inconsistent and dangerous, giving President Issaias the chance to celebrate his victory, strengthen his grip and continue to renege on his promises with impunity.”The press freedom organisation added: “Without questioning aid for the Eritrean population, we think the least that should be done is to no longer allow Eritrea’s president to come and strut about in Brussels.”Officially independent since 24 May 1993, this small country in the Horn of Africa is one of the world’s very few nations with no privately-owned news media. Since 2001, Eritrea’s hundreds of political prisoners have included at least 13 journalists being held in undisclosed locations, without trial and without any contact with the outside world.According to the information obtained by Reporters Without Borders, at least four of them have died in detention as a result of the terrible condition in which they are being held. President Issaias is on the Reporters Without Borders list of “press freedom predators.” Louis Michel, the European commissioner for development and humanitarian aid, received Issaias in Brussels on 4 May, the day after World Press Freedom Day (photo). Claiming to be “very, very honoured to receive (him) at the commission,” Michel announced that Eritrea would receive 122 million euros in aid over five years, for “administrative capacity-building, infrastructures and food aid.”The accord has a clause saying that in return, the European Union requests from the Eritrean government “a constructive approach to the crises in the region and progress on human rights and press freedom.”At a joint press conference with Michel in Brussels, President Issaias contemptuously dismissed critical questions from journalists about human rights. In response to a question from Reporters Without Borders on the French TV station France 24, Michel defended his policy towards Eritrea, saying the fate of its imprisoned journalists was one of the questions systematically raised in bilateral meetings with Issaias, albeit in vain.Michel added that the aid was part of a “global strategy for the Horn of Africa” and that there would be “no solution for any country in the region without a global solution.” On the eve of the 16th anniversary of Eritrea’s independence tomorrow, Reporters Without Borders calls on the European Union to rethink its policy towards what is one of the world’s most repressive and impenetrable countries and, in particular, to adopt targeted sanctions against President Issaias Afeworki (photo). RSF_en Help by sharing this information to go further News Receive email alerts News October 27, 2020 Find out more EritreaAfrica News January 13, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Eritrea Prisoner of Conscience Since 2001 – Why has Sweden not managed to bring Dawit Isaak home? Reports Swedish prosecutors again refuse to investigate Dawit Isaak case RSF urges Swedish judicial authorities to reverse Dawit Isaak decisionlast_img read more

Sole Testimony Of Victim Of Sexual Abuse, If Found Reliable, Is Sufficient To Hold Perpetrator Guilty Of Misconduct In Departmental Enquiry : Uttarakhand HC [Read Judgment]

first_imgNews UpdatesSole Testimony Of Victim Of Sexual Abuse, If Found Reliable, Is Sufficient To Hold Perpetrator Guilty Of Misconduct In Departmental Enquiry : Uttarakhand HC [Read Judgment] LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK24 Jun 2020 1:30 AMShare This – xThe Uttarakhand High Court has observed that sole testimony, of the victim of sexual abuse, is sufficient to hold the perpetrator guilty of misconduct in a departmental enquiry, if it is found reliable. One of the contentions raised by the petitioner (who was a guest instructor for the para- medic course) in this case, challenging the order of dismissal from employment, was that he was…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Uttarakhand High Court has observed that sole testimony, of the victim of sexual abuse, is sufficient to hold the perpetrator guilty of misconduct in a departmental enquiry, if it is found reliable. One of the contentions raised by the petitioner (who was a guest instructor for the para- medic course) in this case, challenging the order of dismissal from employment, was that he was held guilty on the self-serving sole testimony of the complainant (Trainee); no other witness had corroborated the complainant’s testimony; and the complainant’s self-serving evidence cannot form the basis for holding the petitioner guilty of the charges. The Court noted the well settled principle laid down in various Apex Court decisions that an evidence of the victim of sexual assault is enough for conviction, and it does not require any corroboration unless there are compelling reasons for seeking corroboration. The bench comprising of the Chief Justice Ramesh Ranganathan and Justce R.C. Khulbe observed: As the sole testimony of a prosecutrix, in a criminal case involving sexual harassment and molestation, would suffice if it is otherwise reliable, there is no justifiable reason not to accept the sole testimony of a victim, of sexual harassment and molestation, in a departmental inquiry as the enquiry held by a domestic Tribunal is not, unlike a Criminal Court, governed by the strict and technical rules of the Evidence Act. A disciplinary proceeding is not a criminal trial. The standard of proof required is that of preponderance of probabilities, and not proof beyond reasonable doubt. The Court observed that, in this case, the testimony of the complainant gives graphic and shocking details of acts of sexual molestation perpetrated by the petitioner on her. It said that the Enquiry Committee cannot be faulted for largely relying on the testimony of the complainant. Other issues were also found against the petitioner and the Court said that it finds no reason to interfere either with the inquiry proceedings or with the order of punishment of dismissal from service imposed. Case no.: Writ Petition (S/B) No.153 of 2013Case name: Bhuwan Chandra Pandey Vs.Union of IndiaCoram: Chief Justice Ramesh Ranganathan and Justce R.C. Khulbe Counsel: Advocates Sanjay Raturi, Sanjay Bhatt,Click here to Read/Download JudgmentRead JudgmentNext Storylast_img read more

Crisis or opportunity? The search for answers to occupational health’s workforce shortages

first_img Reply Reply ‘I am struggling’ – how workload, hours and stress were overwhelming OH even before coronavirusOccupational health practitioners were stressed, overworked and exhausted even before the coronavirus pandemic, a SOM survey has concluded. Nic Paton… 2 Responses to Crisis or opportunity? The search for answers to occupational health’s workforce shortages Joy Reymond 7 Nov 2019 at 11:15 am # The government’s consultation on occupational health was very clear that the fact OH is and has always been a small specialty could hamper its ambitions to extend access to workplace health support. Occupational Health & Wellbeing and SOM brought together a high-level panel of experts to try to hammer out some answers. Nic Paton reports.Whatever way you cut it, whether you’re talking nurses, physicians, advisers or technicians, occupational health is and has always been a small specialty.For a government with ambitions to extend the reach of, and access to, occupational and workplace health advice and support that’s a problem. Indeed, occupational health’s capacity constraints ran through this summer’s Health is everyone’s business: proposals to reduce ill health-related job loss consultation that closed for responses last month (October).As we reported at the time, the document highlighted the government’s concerns that the commercial OH market may not have the resources or capacity to meet future workforce health and wellbeing demand. The consultation suggested work needed to be done to “scope, deliver, manage and promote an OH workforce model and training and development approaches”.As part of this evidence-gathering process, and to feed into the consultation, SOM and Occupational Health & Wellbeing gathered together a high-level panel in September at Health Education England to hold a roundtable discussion focused specifically on ‘the OH workforce crisis’.The 13-strong panel included representatives from across the profession and included James Hudson, a representative from the government’s Work and Health Unit, although he was there in an observer capacity rather than as a participant.Chaired by SOM chief executive Nick Pahl, the discussion began by considering a review of some of the workforce issues facing the profession written by GP and SOM policy intern Dr Nupur Yogarajah specifically to feed into the event. This had reached six broad conclusions, that there needed to be:An overarching strategy is needed to sustain and develop the OH workforceBetter incorporation of OH into undergraduate course curriculums and extra funding to expand and front-load trainingMore formalising of pathways and accreditation in postgraduate coursesClarity regarding which professions OH actually encompassesStrengthening of the NHS’ commitment to OHBetter collection of OH workforce dataAs Dr Yogarajah explained: “One of the things that pretty much everybody I spoke to highlighted was the lack of funding and resources. Everybody picked up on the fact that at undergraduate level there seems to be less exposure to occupational health; we have got fewer people coming through at that stage. From the postgraduate side, a lot of people mentioned there is often a lack of higher education institutions where people can go off and do further training in whatever branch of OH it may be.”The role, or commitment, of the NHS to delivering occupational health was a further critical element in this complex mix. “It is really about getting a firm commitment about where the NHS will stand. And also its own in-house commitment. There doesn’t seem to be that much investment even for NHS staff, and OH is certainly very absent in primary care,” Dr Yogarajah said.Lack of a clear pictureSOM president Dr Will Ponsonby highlighted that, whether or not you call it a ‘crisis’, the workforce challenges facing the profession are not new. “Ever since I entered occupational medicine, we’ve known the numbers have been falling and we have talked about it but we haven’t taken any action,” he said.Dr Ali Hashtroudi, head of the National School of Occupational Health, argued that one of the challenges the profession faced in terms of funding extra training posts was the lack of data or evidence about both the situation on the ground currently and what needs to change to meet demand in the future.“The first thing is to establish the status quo – at the moment we simply don’t know how many people actually do occupational health, in the broadest terms. I can tell you how many specialist occupational physicians there are based on the GMC’s figures. But that is where the buck stops. No one else has any idea about the rest of the plethora.“If this consultation goes towards opening occupational health more widely to members of the public, that means the current status quo will not be enough to cater for it, so we would have to increase. But if it means we continue with employers purchasing it, it might be actually that the status quo is adequate,” he said.“I agree there is a data issue,” said Nick Pahl. “Depending on what you see as the definition of occupational health, an average of about half the UK workforce currently has access to occupational health. If the government’s objective is that wants this to increase, even if you are going from 50% to 60% or 70% I can’t see a rejigging of the existing OH workforce is really going to allow that expansion.”This question of definition was important, emphasised Deborah Edwards, chair of the Vocational Rehabilitation Association. “I think we need new language, I think we need new terminology and a wider scope of definition of what ‘occupational health’ is and, in particular, one for people who aren’t working and don’t have any support to get back to work if they don’t have a job or are on zero-hours contracts.”OH for all, not just those in work?“I agree with that. Let’s support that idea of provision for employed and unemployed,” said Leicester GP Dr Rob Hampton, representing the Royal College of General Practitioners. “In our practice we see the difference around dealing with people in employment and out of employment. It is almost discriminatory that people who are out of work, and with most need, do not have access to OH and OT.“The other area is people in the gig economy, the self-employed, those working with agencies who I still feel won’t be covered by a lot of the SSP [statutory sick pay] improvements in this paper. In my own particular practice we have an awful lot of people who weren’t born in the UK and they tend to work in gig or agency work, and there is exploitation,” he said.“Is it worth looking at other areas of practice that are also facing workforce challenges and see what their solutions are? And then we may be able to import those into occupational health,” suggested Genevieve Smyth, professional adviser at the Royal College of Occupational Therapists.Emphasising the feasibility of using OH and occupational medicine as a springboard to a more flexible ‘portfolio’ career could be one way of making the profession more attractive to trainee doctors, especially those wishing to work more flexibly, suggested Dr Yogarajah. “I think that is filtering through, these options of working more flexibly and incorporating other things in rather than just having one focused speciality,” she said.One barrier for nurses looking to make the transition into OH was often the fact they had to take a pay cut to do so, highlighted Christina Butterworth, then chief operating officer (now retired) at the Faculty of Occupational Health Nursing. “Nurses will train in the NHS, get up to band six, seven or eight but then to go into occupational health they have to go back down to band five.“The other part is about upskilling; I think it is really important. We have got a great lot of people, a lot of experienced people, but they are still doing basic jobs. And we need to upskill the workforce that is presently there to take on more of a leadership role. One of the vital roles we have is to advise employers what good occupational health is and how they can work in partnership to improve the overall health and wellbeing of the organisation,” she said.Within occupational psychology it is essential to focus at the organisational level at the onset to address business and organisational issues, rather than to start at the individual level to address occupational health and wellbeing, which may be adversely affected by said organisational issues, said Dr Roxane Gervais, member of the British Psychological Society. “I think it is just understanding how we can contribute; how we can make organisations more productive.”Dr Hampton highlighted using the pyramid model (something already on the radar of Health Education England) as a way for different arms of the profession to learn from each other but also more widely. For example, he outlined how drug and alcohol services tend to use a multidisciplinary case management and referral model.“If there was a ‘we are going to design a national OH service’ and maybe restrict that to SMEs, then the model of what goes on in drug and alcohol services could be one to look at. Because most of the work there is with non-clinical case workers and then there is an upscaling and downscaling of need, depending on where the person is with their ‘journey’. When there is a medical problem it goes up and down that hierarchy and it works really, really well,” he said.Sharing of workforce dataAt this point the discussion moved on to consider a number of specific questions raised in the consultation. First was the likely willingness of providers to submit information on the make-up of their workforce to any new co-ordinating body. This led to fierce debate around the definition of the term ‘provider’ and how even you should define ‘your workforce’ in the context of occupational health provision.As Miles Atkinson, chartered physiotherapist and chair of the Association of Charted Physiotherapists in Occupational Health and Ergonomics (ACPOHE), put it: “There are only 350 ACPOHE members (Physiotherapists with specialist training in Occupational Health) who may handle the OH elements of the patients care, but often treatment is undertaken by thousands of physiotherapists with no specific training in Occupational health, so it is unclear how we would classify these clinicians?”Similarly, Kelvin Williams, president elect of the British Occupational Hygiene Society, said: “It comes back to that point of how do you define occupational health delivery? For example, even just within occupational hygiene you have different disciplines. You can have, say, a noise specialist or a ventilation specialist. That skill – occupational hygiene – goes across seven disciplines.”“If you bring in someone who has been injured at work, you may have eight case managers working with him who don’t work for the employer at all,” added Deborah Edwards.“If you have someone [doing occupational health] in-house, they can tell you about that database,” said Christina Butterworth. “But if it’s HR that is running your occupational health, do they understand that somebody else has been called in to help? Who has commissioned that piece of work? It could just be a line manager who did it.”Then there could be unforeseen consequences, warned Genevieve Smyth. “I have seen a problem that has happened in the past where organisations have disclosed their workforce data and another provider has got hold of that information and has said ‘well I see you are operating your service with only one occupational therapist, I’ve been employing three OTs, maybe I don’t need three?’. And that would have the unintended consequence of not increasing but decreasing your workforce because it gets driven down to the lowest common denominator. That is a potential risk.”“This is almost an impossible task. If you ask the big providers you still don’t get a picture of the workforce. Urging providers to give you that data won’t give you an idea of the workforce because the workforce is disparate,” highlighted Dr Hampton.Private OH training?The next question the panel were asked to consider was whether private OH providers should be involved in the training of the clinical workforce.“What we need to do is to make sure the training that goes on in the private sector is at least the equivalent of what goes on in the NHS in terms of quality, and that people get proper training and proper time off for study leave and so on,” said Dr Ponsonby.Christina Butterworth also highlighted the importance of having a credible end-point assessment. “It is who is assessing those people competently at the end of their training; that is so important. How will they know what ‘good’ looks like if they’re not actually specialists themselves?” Alongside this there needed to be focus on access to high-quality continuing professional development, she added.The final consultation question was ‘should there be a single body to co-ordinate the development of the OH workforce in the commercial market?’.Dr Hashtroudi was adamant there already was one body that could help with training side of developing people: the National School of Occupational Health. “But it has to be resourced to look after everybody, not just the medical workforce. You do not need to have a different organisation, with different governance, for the commercial side. There does not need to be a different body, you just need to resource the body that exists already,” he said.ConclusionsAs the discussion drew to a conclusion, Nick Pahl asked participants for their closing reflections.“I think it is the definition of who is included within it [occupational health], because that seems to hinder on so many things, for example how the workforce models will be created,” said Dr Yogarajah. “And I think the issue of postgraduate education is important; how we are going to integrate and standardise things.”“I’d like to see better use of our GPs who have a diploma with an interest role from faculty and the National School of Occupational Health and the college as well,” said Dr Hampton. “But I think there is a wider point, too. There is such heterogenicity of professions here, and it is like no other area I have come across. It’s going to be very difficult to have an umbrella solution on workforce that fits everything. So the question is what can we achieve? And I’m afraid I don’t have the answer to that. But this discussion has made me realise how difficult it is.”Genevieve Smyth said that, for her, encouraging greater use of the pyramid model would be valuable. “I think there is great mileage in the pyramid model, using that as the way to frame how we’re going to expand the workforce at all of those levels: universal, targeted and specialist. I do also think we need to think more about how can we skill up the universal part of the workforce.”Dr Hashtroudi echoed this. “I am encouraged by the interest in the pyramid model. What I want to do when we go away from there is have better communication with all of you round this table; to learn from each other and actually get actions from that. There are things we can learn and actually use. For me, it is all about enhancing our collaboration and getting everybody around the table to actually help us to build that pyramid.”Deborah Edwards agreed the way everyone had come together around the table was in itself positive. Within this there was a need to “identify all of these different areas that do contribute to the whole spectrum of getting people back to work and keeping them in work”, she said. “Doing that work, identifying who they are and what groups they are in. And then you can start looking at how you bring them together at that point of time.”Dr Ponsonby highlighted the need to promote the attractiveness of OH as a flexible, portfolio career. “We have people wanting very different lifestyles now, including doctors and nurses in terms of the way they work and train and so on. I think the pyramid model fits with that in that they can choose where they fit within the pyramid. I think occupational health potentially also fits with that because it gives freedom in terms of lifestyle and things which some of the other specialties don’t have.“The other thing is we should think about technical solutions. So the use of apps, communication tool, all of these things. And then the last part is we should be thinking about training the non-medical/HR/line managers to be more effective in managing these things,” he added.As this point Noorzaman Rashid, chief executive of the Chartered Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors made his first contribution, having held back because of only having been appointed to the post the week before and, therefore, much of the discussion had simply been about learning and observing.He argued that, if the profession wanted the government to listen, it needed to frame its ‘wish list’ around the economic arguments and benefits. “Rather than us telling the government how much better we can practice, how much better we can learn and train each other, it needs to be the economic argument in terms of the actual problem we are trying to solve for the country. We have to provide data on the economic arguments. One of the starting points is a huge piece of work on workforce analysis and the skills profile in each of the spheres of influence. That’s my take.”Dr Gervais highlighted the need to emphasise to organisations that they have a legal responsibility to keep people healthy and safe within the working environment. “It is about prevention – and occupational psychologists can add value by going into organisations and looking at the structure, looking at the focus, and then showing how they can actually not make people ill and fall out of the workplace. Treatment is fine but we need to start with fewer people actually leaving the workplace because of ill health, bullying or harassment or whatever, which can cause depression.”“I would echo that,” said Kelvin Williams, “the need to focus on prevention, for example through occupational hygiene courses. I would like to see more emphasis on that.”“For me it is very much about looking at what leadership is,” said Christina Butterworth. “It is really going back to first principles. We need to think more about how we care for people. Everything focuses on the 5% of people who are sick, and we don’t learn the lessons from them 95% who are well and working effectively.”“For me it is about structure,” added Miles Atkinson. “It would be good to get some movement on structure. It could be the pyramid model piece, and the right people at the right time. And then also it is about training I think; that is one of the needs that we need to keep working on.”Nick Pahl then brought the discussion to a close with some final thoughts. “I agree we need to look at what other sectors have done in response to occupational crisis; I think it would be useful to scope that out.“I also think we need to think more about the data and how we collect data and what would that look like? And thinking about leadership, we need to get the bases right and the training pathways and the CPD. We need the next generation of leaders who can help us get through. For example, I would love to see a master’s in occupational health leadership where people from different professional groups come together. We do need that change to happen.”ParticipantsDr Nupur Yogarajah, GP extensivist, Croydon Hospital, clinical project lead, Medicines Management, Greenwich CCG, policy intern, Society of Occupational MedicineMiles Atkinson, MSK corporate service lead for Vita Health Group and chair of the Association of Charted Physiotherapists in Occupational Health and Ergonomics (ACPOHE)Christina Butterworth, chief operating officer (now retired), Faculty of Occupational Health NursingDeborah Edwards, director, consultant and case manager, RTW Plus, chair, Vocational Rehabilitation AssociationDr Roxane Gervais, chartered psychologist and HCPC-registered occupational psychologist, member of the British Psychological SocietyDr Rob Hampton, Leicester GP and representing the Royal College of General PractitionersDr Ali Hashtroudi, clinical director, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, director of occupational health services and head of the National School of Occupational HealthJames Hudson, lead of the analytical team focusing on occupational health at the Work and Health Unit, Department for Work and Pensions and Department of Health and Social CareNick Pahl, chief executive, Society of Occupational Medicine (chair)Dr Will Ponsonby, president, Society of Occupational MedicineNoorzaman Rashid, chief executive, Chartered Institute of Ergonomics and Human FactorsGenevieve Smyth, professional adviser, Royal College of Occupational TherapistsKelvin Williams, president elect, British Occupational Hygiene SocietyReferencesHealth is everyone’s business: proposals to reduce ill health-related job loss, July 2019, Department for Work and Pensions and Department of Health and Social Care, https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/health-is-everyones-business-proposals-to-reduce-ill-health-related-job-lossWhat government’s workplace health consultation means for OH, September 2019, Occupational Health & Wellbeing, https://www.personneltoday.com/hr/what-governments-workplace-health-consultation-means-for-oh/OH job opportunities on Personnel TodayBrowse more OH jobs Good to see an Occupational Hygienist involved. While the report focuses very much on the clinical aspects, it remains important not to overlook the critical role of the industrial hygienist. If we understand the potential exposures to hazards in the workplace – and many physical, chemical and biological still threaten health – control of exposure can take place. Future challenges also include how self-employed, and SME’s access such advice in a 4th Industrial revolution that has the potential for more and new exposures, changes to working patterns. We are also on the cusp of potential deregulation of worker protections that the EU has fostered. Much to ponder on, and my apologies for more questions than answers but there are more ques……. Richard Heron 6 Nov 2019 at 8:01 pm #center_img Previous Article Next Article There are a myriad of different provider, all with valuable expertise to offer. Rather than trying to identify the professions required for OH, Would it be more helpful to identify the tasks and the skills required to keep people in work or help them return to work?For this to work in practice, you might need to create a signposting role, which would identify what skills would be needed to respond to a specific case, and then potentially to engage the people with those skills, if they didn’t possess them themselves. Ideally this would be someone within an enterprise who is accountable for the organisation’s success in keeping and returning people to work following injury or illness. Crisis or opportunity? The search for answers to occupational health’s workforce shortagesBy Nic Paton on 1 Nov 2019 in Clinical governance, OH service delivery, Occupational Health, Personnel Today Occupational health on the coronavirus frontline – ‘I have been working as a “test and trace” caseworker’During August, we are telling the stories of occupational health nurses who have come to the aid of the hard-pressed… Related posts: Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply.Comment Name (required) Email (will not be published) (required) Websitelast_img read more

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