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ECTOR COUNTY FELONY DISPOSITIONS Feb. 19, 2018

first_img ECTOR COUNTY FELONY DISPOSITIONS Feb. 19, 2018 Twitter Facebook Facebook Local NewsCrime WhatsApp Twitter Arts Council of Midland logo The following is a list of felony dispositions from the Ector County District Clerk’s Office. Listed attorneys do not necessarily represent who was involved when the case was disposed.ABANDONING/ENDANGERING CHILDReyna Valenzuela, 30, had four counts of abandoning or endangering a child dismissed Feb. 7. Judge Denn Whalen presided. Michael McLeaish was the defense attorney and Brooke Hendricks-Green was the prosecutor. ASSAULTLarry Ray Simmons, 47, had a charge of assault (family violence) dismissed Feb. 7. Whalen presided. Jason Schoel was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Dominic Dannie Taylor, 30, had a charge of assault of a family or household member by impeding breath or circulation dismissed Feb. 7. Whalen presided. Tony Chavez was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Michael David Kildow Jr., 56, pleaded guilty Feb. 8 to aggravated assault with a deadly weapon (family violence) and was sentenced to seven years in prison. Judge Stacy Trotter approved the deal. Bob Garcia Jr. was the defense attorney and Clay George and Julie Prentiss were the prosecutors. Olivia French, 32, had a charge of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon dismissed Feb. 9. Judge John Smith presided. Tony Chavez was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Roberto Holguin Jr., 34, had a charge of assault causing bodily injury (family violence) dismissed Feb. 9. Trotter presided. Mike Holmes was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Reyes Manuel Levario, 48, pleaded guilty Feb. 12 to assault on a public servant and was sentenced to five years probation and deferred adjudication. Smith approved the deal. Robert Garcia Jr. was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Bradley Dean Bourke, 36, had charges of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and theft of a firearm dismissed Feb. 13 in the interest of justice. Smith presided. Tony Chavez was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Hector Manuel Martinez Jr., 21, pleaded guilty Feb. 13 to four counts of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and charges of stalking, aggravated robbery with a deadly weapon, burglary of a habitation and evading arrest with a vehicle and was sentenced to seven years probation and deferred adjudication. Martinez also pleaded guilty to theft of a firearm and was sentenced to five years probation and deferred adjudication. Judge James Rush approved the deal. McLeaish was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.BURGLARYDiego Alex Hernandez, 22, was sentenced to 10 years in prison in an order adjudicating guilt Jan. 31 on a charge of burglary of a habitation. Whalen approved the deal. Prentiss was the defense attorney and George was the prosecutor. Edward Hernandez, 18, pleaded guilty Feb. 8 to burglary of a habitation and two counts of robbery and was sentenced to five years in prison. Hernandez also had a charge of theft of a firearm dismissed as part of the deal. Rush approved the deal. Robert Garcia was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Pablo Galindo Jr., 23, pleaded guilty Feb. 13 to burglary of a habitation and was sentenced to five years in prison. Trotter approved the deal. McLeaish was the defense attorney and Prentiss was the prosecutor. Penney Renea Ybarra, 44, pleaded guilty Feb. 13 to burglary of a habitation and two counts of theft of property, less than $2,500, with two or more previous convictions and was sentenced to two years in prison and 180 days in state jail, respectively, on those charges. Trotter approved the deal. McLeaish was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.CREDIT CARD ABUSECody Don Campbell, 27, pleaded guilty Feb. 9 to credit card abuse and was sentenced to three years probation and deferred adjudication. Rush approved the deal. Don Fletcher was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.DEADLY CONDUCTJuan Dominguez Hernandez, 24, was sentenced to four years in prison in an order adjudicating guilt Feb. 6 on a charge of deadly conduct. Smith approved the deal. Bret Mansur was the defense attorney and Chris Fostel was the prosecutor. DRIVING WHILE INTOXICATEDEdgar Baltazar, 30, pleaded guilty Feb. 7 to driving while intoxicated, third or more, and was sentenced to two years in prison. Smith approved the deal. Robert Hollmann was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Larry F. Estorga, 39, pleaded guilty Feb. 8 to driving while intoxicated, third or more, and was sentenced to five years probation. Trotter approved the deal. Gary Garrison was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Mark Gregory Melton, 60, pleaded guilty Feb. 8 to driving while intoxicated, third or more, and was sentenced to four years in prison. Trotter approved the deal. Garrison was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Marcela Knight Vega, 40, pleaded guilty Feb. 8 to driving while intoxicated, third or more, and was sentenced to four years in prison. Whalen approved the deal. Kevin Acker was the defense attorney and George was the prosecutor. Danny Lamar Baker, 45, had a charge of driving while intoxicated, third or more, dismissed Feb. 13 in the interest of justice. Smith presided. J. Roxane Blount was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.EVADING ARRESTCornell Thomas, 39, pleaded guilty Feb. 8 to evading arrest with a previous conviction and was sentenced to 12 months in state jail. Trotter approved the deal. Justin Low was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Jason Matthew Speight, 36, pleaded guilty Feb. 9 to evading arrest with a previous conviction and was sentenced to 14 months in state jail. Speight also had a charge of possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, dismissed Feb. 13 as part of the deal. Rush approved the deal. Hollmann was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Jose Carlos Torres Jr., 46, pleaded guilty Feb. 9 to evading arrest with a vehicle and unauthorized use of a vehicle and was sentenced to five years in prison and 12 months in state jail, respectively, on those charges. Trotter approved the deal. Holmes was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Tony Robert Montoya, 38, pleaded guilty Feb. 13 to evading arrest with a vehicle and was sentenced to five years probation. Trotter approved the deal. McLeaish was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.FORGERYNatalie Nichole Duralia, 27, pleaded guilty Feb. 8 to forgery and was sentenced to four years probation and deferred adjudication. Duralia also had a charge of forgery of a financial instrument dismissed Feb. 9. Whalen approved the deal. Acker was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Paula Gene Munos, 43, pleaded guilty Feb. 9 to three counts of forgery and was sentenced to three years probation and deferred adjudication. Trotter approved the deal. Holmes was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Melinda Diann Warren, 22, pleaded guilty Feb. 12 to forgery of a financial instrument and tampering with or fabricating physical evidence and was sentenced to three years probation and deferred adjudication. Trotter approved the deal. Blount was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.INDECENCY WITH CHILDMark Anthony Alejo, 33, pleaded guilty Feb. 7 to three counts of indecency with a child and was sentenced to five years in prison. Trotter approved the deal. Jason Leach was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.INJURY TO CHILD/ELDERLY/DISABLED PERSONAndrea Elaine Hernandez, 34, had a charge of injury to a child, elderly or disabled person with intent to cause bodily injury (family violence) dismissed Feb. 9. Smith presided. BJ Brown was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Vianca Rincon Veimau, 27, had a charge of injury to a child dismissed Feb. 12. Smith presided. Anthony Robles was the defense attorney and Amanda Navarette was the prosecutor. KIDNAPPINGStephanie Avery, 37, had a charge of aggravated kidnapping dismissed Feb. 9. Trotter presided. McLeaish was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.POSSESSION OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCEMary Ellen Friesen, 60, was sentenced to 12 months in state jail in and order adjudicating guilt Jan. 26 on a charge of possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram. Whalen approved the deal. Holmes was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Chrystell Lynn Cole, 39, pleaded guilty Feb. 7 to possession of a controlled substance, one gram or more but less than four grams, and was sentenced to three years probation and deferred adjudication. Whalen approved the deal. Acker was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Triston Laroy Coleman, 21, pleaded guilty Feb. 7 to possession of a controlled substance and possession of a controlled substance, one gram or more but less than four grams, and was sentenced to five years probation and deferred adjudication. Whalen approved the deal. Acker was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Alexandro Hernandez, 23, pleaded guilty Feb. 7 to possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, and was sentenced to two years probation and deferred adjudication. Whalen approved the deal. McLeaish was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Rebecca Jo Jimenez, 40, pleaded guilty Feb. 7 to possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, and was sentenced to two years probation and deferred adjudication. Whalen approved the deal. McLeaish was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Adriana Ortega, 27, pleaded guilty Feb. 7 to possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, and was sentenced to two years probation and deferred adjudication. Whalen approved the deal. Acker was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Christopher Marquette Reese, 34, pleaded guilty Feb. 7 to possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, and was sentenced to two years probation and deferred adjudication. Whalen approved the deal. Acker was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Joshua Anthony Velasquez, 25, pleaded guilty Feb. 7 to possession of a controlled substance, one gram or more but less than four grams, and was sentenced to five years probation and deferred adjudication. Smith approved the deal. Hollmann was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Merari Bernal Duran, 29, pleaded guilty Feb. 8 to possession of a controlled substance, one gram or more but less than four grams, and was sentenced to two years in prison. Whalen approved the deal. Laura Carpenter was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Shantaneya Elace Harris, 25, pleaded guilty Feb. 8 to possession of a controlled substance, one gram or more but less than four grams, and was sentenced to three years in prison. Whalen approved the deal. Hollmann was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Genevieve Sanchez, 47, pleaded guilty Feb. 8 to possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, and was sentenced to two years probation and deferred adjudication. Trotter approved the deal. Garrison was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Andi Heather Trevizo, 28, pleaded guilty Feb. 8 to possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, and was sentenced to two years probation and deferred adjudication. Whalen approved the deal. Schoel was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Fredrick Sanders Bars, 54, pleaded guilty Feb. 9 to possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, and was sentenced to 12 months in state jail. Trotter approved the deal. Marc Chastain was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Skyla Marie Pippen, 25, pleaded guilty Feb. 9 to possession of a controlled substance, four grams or more but less than 200 grams, and was sentenced to 10 years probation and deferred adjudication. Trotter approved the deal. Holmes was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Ronald Thie Rossingh, 24, pleaded guilty Feb. 9 to possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, and was sentenced to nine months in state jail. Rush approved the deal. Fletcher was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Daniel Ubina-Ramirez, 27, pleaded guilty Feb. 9 to possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, and was sentenced to 180 days in state jail. Ubina-Ramirez also had a charge of bail jumping and failure to appear dismissed as part of the deal. Rush approved the deal. Brian Chavez was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Max Brandon Sibayan, 40, pleaded guilty Feb. 13 to possession of a controlled substance, one gram or more but less than four grams, and was sentenced to nine months in state jail. Trotter approved the deal. Mansur was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Catherine Nadine Watkins, 40, pleaded guilty Feb. 13 to possession of a controlled substance, one gram or more but less than four grams, and was sentenced to two years probation. Trotter approved the deal. Tony Chavez was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.ROBBERYDesiree Monique Crayton, 24, was sentenced to five years in prison in an order adjudicating guilt Jan. 31 on a charge of robbery. Whalen approved the deal. McLeaish was the defense attorney and George was the prosecutor. SEX OFFENDER DUTY TO REGISTERJermar Williams, 32, pleaded guilty Feb. 8 to failure to comply with sex offender duty to register annually for 10 years and was sentenced to 226 days in state jail. Williams was given credit for time served. Whalen approved the deal. Schoel was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.THEFTDestiny Dawn Fuller, 32, pleaded guilty Feb. 7 to theft of property, less than $2,500, with two or more previous convictions and was sentenced to 180 days in state jail. Trotter approved the deal. Robert Garcia was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Richard Patrick Chipman, 47, pleaded guilty Feb. 8 to theft of material (aluminum/bronze/copper), less than $20,000, and was sentenced to three years probation and deferred adjudication. Whalen approved the deal. Schoel was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Rebecca May, 50, pleaded guilty Feb. 9 to theft of property, less than $2,500, with two or more previous convictions and was sentenced to two years probation and deferred adjudication. Trotter approved the deal. Holmes was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Brian Portillo, 37, pleaded guilty Feb. 9 to theft, $1,500 or more but less than $20,000, and was sentenced to 12 months in state jail. Portillo also had a charge of bail jumping and failure to appear dismissed Feb. 13 as part of the deal. Rush approved the deal. Glen Halsell was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Otis Kyle Neatherlin, 30, had a charge of theft, $2,500 or more but less than $30,000, dismissed Feb. 13 because he pleaded guilty to charges in county court. Smith presided. Brian Chavez was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed. By admin – February 19, 2018 Pinterest Pinterest WhatsApp Previous articleSTONE: Is your bathroom making you sick?Next articleCOLLEGE BASKETBALL: UTPB men show potential in Senior Day dismantling of Texas A&M-Kingsville adminlast_img read more

Ice draft and current measurements from the north-western Barents Sea, 1993-96

first_imgFrom 1993 to 1996, three oceanographic moorings were deployed in the north-western Barents Sea, each with a current meter and an upward-looking sonar for measuring ice drafts. These yielded three years of current and two years of ice draft measurements. An interannual variability of almost 1 m was measured in the average ice draft. Causes for this variability are explored, particularly its possible connection to changes in atmospheric circulation patterns. We found that the flow of Northern Barents Atlantic-derived Water and the transport of ice from the Central Arctic into the Barents Sea appears to be controlled by winds between Nordaustlandet and Franz Josef Land, which in turn may be influenced by larger-scale variations such as the Arctic Oscillation/North Atlantic Oscillation.last_img read more

Unlock the Potential of Unstructured Data with DataIQ

first_imgData determines the winners and losers in the digital ageIf we examine the top trends many organizations are focused on today—harnessing big data and analytics, embracing the Internet of Things, investing in artificial intelligence—they all have a common foundation. Data.It’s data that powers digital transformation and the digital economy. The organizations best positioned to win in this data era are those who have superior strategies for collecting and harnessing the untapped potential locked away in this ever-growing ocean of data.Unstructured data driving data sprawlUnstructured data is driving much of this growth. Gartner analysts estimated that nearly 80% of the data footprint for an organization is unstructured¹, and that enterprises will triple their unstructured data stored as file or object storage from what they had in 2019.² Adding to this complex equation is the fact that unstructured data growth is not consigned to the core data center, but is spreading across geographically dispersed and edge locations. According to Gartner, by 2022, more than 50% of enterprise-generated data will be created and processed outside the data center or cloud, up from less than 10% in 2019.³The end result is a growing, complex and increasingly siloed data landscape that must be managed with relatively flat IT budgets. This reality decreases the pace of innovation across teams and hampers their ability to collaborate effectively as more organizations are forced to focus on keeping the lights on, rather than driving real business value.PowerScale and DataIQ: Designed for the data eraToday, we introduced Dell EMC PowerScale, a new family of unstructured data storage systems that builds on the legacy that Isilon and OneFS have carved out in scale-out NAS. Customers can deploy PowerScale across edge, core and cloud environments, empowering organizations to capture data, wherever it’s being generated, at scale. But unstructured data storage alone isn’t enough to establish a strategy which puts data first. To truly solve the challenges detailed, organizations require tools that help them discover all the unstructured data strewn across the enterprise landscape, understand its characteristics and act on novel insights to accelerate the data lifecycle and optimize the environment.Enter Dell EMC DataIQ.DataIQ is multi-purpose dataset management software which delivers a unique method for managing unstructured data stored across multiple, heterogenous file and object storage platforms either on-premises or in the cloud. An advanced filesystem scan, index, classification and fast search platform, it provides single-pane-of-glass visibility into all unstructured data assets under management. This includes Dell EMC unstructured storage products such as the new PowerScale family (including Isilon), ECS, PowerStore and Unity. It’s also capable of providing a holistic data view across third-party and public cloud environments. DataIQ’s core dataset management capabilities are included with PowerScale, so customers can quickly start capturing value from their unstructured storage.Controlling the data lifecycle and accelerating time-to-insightsDataIQ helps control the data lifecycle by giving both IT and business users a toolset which enables them track data through its lifespan, ensuring the location of the data is known, determining if it is stored on the right platform and if it is accessible by the right stakeholders. Using custom tagging functionality, users can also logically group data from disparate systems together and manage it according to relevant business context. This capability is useful for correlating related folder and file assets which might be stored on different volumes, across multiple platforms, according to how actual project teams are organized within a business. Summary reports can subsequently be built which display total storage consumption by project name, team designation, or even project stage of completion, rather than being limited to reports based on simple file extensions.DataIQ also enables users to move data on-demand via its plugin ecosystem. This gives IT and content creators a means to transfer data to the right storage platform and performance tier, improving collaboration and meeting TCO objectives.By empowering employees to rapidly locate data, organize it based on unique context and move it as needed, organizations accelerate time-to-insights and can make smarter decisions on how data should be moved through the lifecycle. From creation to analysis, deletion to rehydration, DataIQ speeds time-to-value at each phase.Using DataIQ, organizations can break down data silos, make more informed decisions about data assets, speed up dataset management and unlock the potential hidden away in their unstructured data.¹ Gartner, Inc. “Market Guide for File Analysis Software” by Alan Dayley, Guido De Simoni, Julian Tirsu, Garth Landers, March-Antoine Meunier, March 27, 2018² Magic Quadrant for Distributed File Systems and Object Storage(source: Gartner, Inc. “Magic Quadrant for Distributed File Systems and Object Storage” by Julia Palmer, Raj Bala, Chandra Mukhyala, September 30, 2019³ Gartner Top 10 Trends Impacting Infrastructure & Operations for 2020, December 2019last_img read more

Governor Wolf Announces Low-Interest Loans for Survivors of Chester County Apartment Fire

first_img Economy,  Press Release Governor Tom Wolf announced today that the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) approved his request to declare a disaster in Chester County after a devastating fire on July 31 destroyed dozens of homes in North Coventry Township.“Many people living in the Ashwood Apartment building lost everything they own,” said Governor Wolf. “The availability of low-interest loans provides a glimmer of hope for people who right now might desperately need it.”Homeowners, renters and businesses impacted by the Chester County fire, as well as neighboring counties of Berks, Delaware, Lancaster and Montgomery, may be eligible for low-interest disaster loans through the SBA Disaster Loan Programs.Low-interest loans of up to $200,000 are available to homeowners to repair or replace damaged or destroyed real estate. SBA regulations permit loans up to $40,000 to repair or replace damaged personal property, including vehicles. Businesses and nonprofits can borrow up to $2 million as a Physical Disaster Loan to restore damaged or destroyed buildings, inventory, equipment and assets. Economic Injury Disaster Loans may also be used to pay fixed debts, payroll, accounts payable and other bills that can’t be paid because of the disaster’s impact.SBA offers long-term repayment options to keep payments affordable, with terms up to a maximum of 30 years. Terms are determined on a case-by-case basis, based upon each borrower’s ability to repay.In accordance with health precautions for the Coronavirus (COVID-19), the SBA will not establish a physical Disaster Loan Outreach Center (DLOC) in the community to assist applicants. However, SBA will continue to provide first class customer service and conduct outreach virtually with webinars, skype calls, phone assistance and step-by-step application assistance.To this end, SBA has opened a Virtual Disaster Loan Outreach Center (VDLOC) to help survivors apply online using the Electronic Loan Application (ELA) via the SBA’s secure website at https://disasterloanassistance.sba.gov/ and there are virtual customer support representatives available to assist applicants with completing the online application.Those who want to apply for an SBA loan should contact the Customer Service Representatives at (571) 422-6871 or (571) 422-6078 to schedule an appointment for immediate one-on-one assistance in completing their applications. Requests for SBA disaster loan program information may be obtained by emailing [email protected] The SBA will conduct extensive outreach to ensure that all impacted by the disaster are afforded the opportunity to seek assistance.Virtual Disaster Loan Outreach Center (VDLOC)Open: Monday – FridayHours: 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.Closed: Saturdays and SundaysEmail: [email protected] for Individuals & Businesses: (571) 422-6871 or (571) 422-6078It is important to note that this VDLOC information applies only to applicants affected by the fire in Chester County. It is not applicable for any other SBA declaration or COVID-19-related SBA assistance.Applicants may also call SBA’s Customer Service Center at (800) 659-2955 or email [email protected] for more information on SBA disaster assistance. Individuals who are deaf or hard-of-hearing may call (800) 877-8339.Applicants may apply online using the Electronic Loan Application (ELA) via the SBA’s secure website at https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela. Loan applications can also be downloaded at www.sba.gov/disaster. Completed paper applications should be mailed to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX 76155.The filing deadline to return applications for physical property damage is October 16, 2020. The deadline to return economic injury disaster loan applications is May 17, 2021.Ver esta página en español. August 18, 2020 Governor Wolf Announces Low-Interest Loans for Survivors of Chester County Apartment Firecenter_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

As Expected, Marine Park Back To the Drawing Board

first_imgBy Marion Lynch RED BANK – It’s back to the drawing board for the Borough Council’s efforts to restore the area of Marine Park where the clay tennis courts are located. Supporters of the courts won a battle this week in their years-long fight to preserve them when Councilwoman Linda Schwabenbauer announced at Monday’s Borough Council meeting that they would reject all three proposals for projects in the area of Marine Park where the storm-damaged courts are located.The three members of the council’s parks and recreation committee – Schwabenbauer, Kathy Horgan and Edward Zipprich – reviewed three proposals, and the plan that scored the highest was the one least favored by residents.“The Jetsun proposal came out on top numerically,” Schwabenbauer said, “but the preponderance of public opinion was not in favor.”The committee’s only option, she said is to reject all three proposals. A formal resolution will be on the agenda for the Nov. 23 meeting.The proposal submitted by Jetsun Enterprises, a group of private investors, was the most ambitious of the three submitted to the council’s request for proposals (RFP) back in April.That plan called for the construction of an 18-hole miniature golf course, synthetic, year-round ice rink, a food concession stand, a boathouse offering canoe and kayak rentals; there would also be driven golf carts to take patrons to and from offsite parking.The other plans call for rebuilding the tennis courts and operating them independently from the borough, providing the borough with a portion of the proceeds; and a boathouse and catering hall that would offer boat rentals and recreational and educational program sponsored by the Navesink River Rowing Club and Navesink Maritime Heritage Association.When evaluating the three plans the parks and rec committee relied on quantifiable criteria in making its determination. Using that matrix, the Jetsun proposal was the clear winner, “by a head and shoulders,” Schwabenbauer told the Two River Times last week.
 Mayor Pasquale Menna said Monday that it would be “back to the drawing board” in the borough’s efforts to restore the area of the park surrounding the courts. The red clay tennis courts, constructed in the 1930s, were severely damaged in Super Storm Sandy in 2012 and have been unusable for the past three years.In response to a question from Councilwoman Cindy Burnham, Schwabenbauer the council’s “hands were tied” and could not select the second best proposal.“We’re just following the law and public opinion. Now we’re going to start over from scratch,” said Horgan.Burnham stressed that “RFPs cost money,” and said that state law allows municipalities to lease municipal property to a nonprofit if they meet certain criteria. “Which, I do believe the tennis courts meet. So you could accept a nonprofit without going out to an RFP.”To Burnham’s charges that the RFP process was “not transparent” and that residents “did not know what was going on,” Schwabenbauer responded, “I think 83 people knew the process well enough to send some letters. The committee received 83 letters, 12 emails and “lots of phone calls” from residents, she reported.Supporters of the courts formed a non-profit organization, Red Bank Clay Tennis Courts Association, represented by attorney Donald Pepe.“We don’t need another RFP,” Pepe told the council. The group recommends a public-private partnership to repair and maintain the courts. “The money is there to fix these courts.”More than a dozen people in attendance held up “Save the Courts” signs at one point in the discussion.“If the borough doesn’t have the funding, there is private money available,” Pepe later told The Two River Times.John Burton contributed to this story.last_img read more

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