Month: June 2021 Page 1 of 15

Ireland 42-10 Italy

first_imgRob Kearney was ruthless in attackStar man Jonathan Sexton was the official Man of the Match, but full-back Rob Kearney proved a dangerous weapon in attack, running round a number of his Italian opponents to create opportunities for his team-mates.Room for improvementIreland travel to Paris knowing there is much to improve on, and though Keith Earls scored in the 17th minute and Bowe in the 39th, Ireland were frustrated that they could not convert more of their pressure into points in the first half. The game was largely played in Ireland’s half, prompting Declan Kidney to say: “There was a bit of wearing down that had to be done in the first 50 minutes, as there are in all Test matches.“We could probably have done a little more of that in their half rather than ours, but I can’t fault the boys for trying to play. “We had the courage to play, but what we need to do is get the balance right. That comes with playing together and the more time we spend together the better we’ll become.“But can’t go away thinking everything’s great just because we scored a few late tries.”In quotesIreland captain Paul O’Connell: “We have a lot of excellent and classy players and we took our tries well, which was satisfying. It was a good, patient performance. It’s great to get that result going to Paris, so we’re probably in a better place than we were the last time we went over.”Sergio Parisse runs in for Italy’s tryItaly coach Jacques Brunel: “We had two different teams out there. In the first half we tried to play and kept the score close. But in the second half it was completely different, we suffered beneath the Irish pressure and made many mistakes.”Match stat Veteran fly-half Ronan O’Gara came on in the 70th minute to win his 118th Ireland cap, and overtaking Brian O’Driscoll to become Ireland’s most-capped player.Click here to watch match highlightsIreland: Rob Kearney; Tommy Bowe, Keith Earls (Fergus McFadden 68), Gordon D’Arcy (Ronan O’Gara 70), Andrew Trimble; Jonathan Sexton, Conor Murray (Eoin Reddan 54); Cian Healy (Tom Court 70), Rory Best (Sean Cronin 70), Mike Ross, Donncha O’Callaghan (Donncha Ryan 59), Paul O’Connell (capt), Stephen Ferris, Sean O’Brien (Peter O’Mahony 59), Jamie Heaslip.Tries (5): Earls, Bowe (2), Court, Trimble. Cons (4) Sexton. Pens (3): Sexton.Italy: Andrea Masi; Giovanbattista Venditti, Tomasso Benvenuti, Alberto Sgarbi (Gonzalo Javier Canale 63), Luke McLean; Tobias Botes (Kristopher Burton 59), Edoardo Gori (Fabio Semenzato 72); Michele Rizzo, Leonardo Ghiraldini (Tommaso D’Apice 72), Lorenzo Cittadini (Fabio Staibano 68), Quintin Geldenhuys (Antonio Pavanello 59), Marco Bortolami, Alessandro Zanni, Robert Barbieri (Simone Favaro 63), Sergio Parisse (capt). LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Captain Paul O’Connell competes at a lineoutBy Bea Asprey, Rugby World WriterIn a nutshell Having not played a match for three weeks, Ireland looked nervous as they came out of the Aviva Stadium blocks, but they exerted consistent pressure on their opponents and were rewarded with five tries. The hosts were penalised within kicking distance a number of times, but luckily for them it was not Italian fly-half Tobias Botes’s day with the boot. Man of the Match Jonathan Sexton, on the other hand, was successful with seven out of eight kicks at goal, notching up a total of 18 points.Key moment Centre Gordon D’Arcy’s break in the 13th minute was Ireland’s first assault on Italy’s line, and the men in green were relentless throughout the contest. Though Italy had their moment of glory, as Sergio Parisse scored under the posts five minutes before the half-time break, Ireland had the last laugh of the half thanks to a try from Tommy Bowe. Try: Parisse. Con: Botes. Pen: Botes.Referee: Craig Joubertlast_img read more

England must develop killer instinct

first_img Sharp shooter: Charlie Sharples scored two tries on Saturday – but could have had more if England had been clinicalBy Alex LoweENGLAND’S OPENING QBE International against Fiji was always going to be a nicely-timed opportunity to blow off some cobwebs before the arrival of Australia, South Africa and New Zealand.It is impossible to look at it in any other context. An England victory was inevitable and it is difficult, foolhardy even, to draw too many firm conclusions from this one performance as to whether Stuart Lancaster’s men are up to the standard required to test the world’s top three nations.The England management have made no secret in the build-up to the autumn campaign of their desire to emulate world champions New Zealand – from the All Blacks’ ability to evolve as a team to their ruthlessness in attack, it is they who set the standards in the global game.Bright spark: full-back Alex GoodeSo would New Zealand have put 80 points on this below-strength Fiji side? They may well have, such is their ability to see an opportunity and take it. That is what England are aiming for and, judging by the Fiji performance, there is still a way to go on that front.England scored seven tries but failed to convert a host of other opportunities. That ruthless execution is what Lancaster and his coaching team will be working on this week. They must expect to meet the Australia who drew 18-18 with New Zealand, not the Australia who were thumped by France on Saturday night.England must also ensure this propensity to start slowly does not develop into a habit. Of course, England will find themselves on the defensive at times but to have been on the back foot for the best part of 20 minutes against Fiji was a concern. Better sides would have punished England in that opening quarter, as South Africa did on the summer tour.But let’s not be too churlish. This was a decent first hit-out for an England side still in the foothills of its development and there were some obvious plus points. Alex Goode for one. The Saracens full-back has brought a new dimension to England’s attacking game. He views the game in widescreen, like a fly-half, which makes him so effective when he joins the attack as England’s second playmaker.Harlequins full-back Mike Brown has his obvious qualities – a rock at the back, a huge boot – but it is Goode who has the ability to transform England from predictable to a team with attacking potential.As Goode himself said after the match, England’s Six Nations campaign was founded on tenacity, defence and a good kicking game. With Goode at full-back, England have the potential to ask questions of the best defences in the world for the first time in about a decade. The challenge now – and it is not an insignificant one given England have not managed it with consistency since 2003 – is to turn that potential into reality against the three best teams in the world.Call back: will Jonathan Joseph face Australia?I’d start Jonathan Joseph at outside-centre against the Wallabies and move Manu Tuilagi to 12. For all Brad Barritt’s commitment, Joseph is a more dangerous attacking prospect and I’d be excited to see him combine with Danny Care, Toby Flood, Tuilagi and Goode.Charlie Sharples took his opportunity well in Chris Ashton’s absence, coming within an inch of a hat-trick on his first Twickenham start and he was lively off his wing.Ashton will return to face the Wallabies and Lancaster’s choice is then between Sharples, also a natural right wing, or Ugo Monye. Both calls have their merits. NOT FOR FEATURED LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Tom Youngs enjoyed a rumbustious debut at hooker, although it was probably his easiest game of the season given Fiji barely contested any set-piece. Like England as a whole, this was a nice introduction to the increasingly tough challenges to come.Follow Alex Lowe on Twitter @AlexMLowelast_img read more

Rieko Ioane: “I’m like a kid in a candy store”

first_img“Shag (head coach Steve Hansen) has had a plan, even post-World Cup. It’s about getting players into the shape and the brand they play. The young fellas, we’re keen and we’ve been pushed and encouraged by senior players like Kieran Read and Jerome Kaino.”Judging by the way he has quickly reacted to try-scoring opportunities in the Rugby Championship, is it fair to say Ioane is now comfortable in that environment? “A couple of those moments I put down to the players around you. It was Aaron Smith’s quick thinking to kick (for a try against South Africa) – all I had to do was catch the ball. I’d probably put it down to instinct. It was tidy to get a meat pie.“I probably had one of those (stunned) moments on the bus on the way to the first Lions Test in Auckland. It was just a sea of black and red. I think I zeroed out and had a think to myself. I do have those moments every Saturday that we play. I’m just enjoying it at the moment, mate. We get to travel, go to nice places – everything’s just fun for me, as it would be for anyone. I’m like a kid in a candy store. I’m having heaps of fun.“But you do have to buy in. The All Blacks environment does force you to grow up a bit. You wanna be the best but if you ever think you’ve made it or you can just do enough to get by, it teaches you pretty quickly to grow up and take responsibility.”Scoring again: This time against the WallabiesFor so many young athletes, the serious side of things is tied to performance. When it’s going well, hey, the professionalism must have been there all along, lads. When it hits the fan though, maybe you didn’t take enough responsibility or eased off at some point in your preparation cycle.Ioane hasn’t had any real bumps in the road during his career yet, so we can’t know how he will cope – though he is endearingly open and focused, but also refreshingly nerveless as he talks. Those are rare qualities for a professional athlete so young and it’s a reassuring sign for the future. So who could begrudge him his fun?Take the Blues’ match against the Lions. After leaving Nowell to curse his own feet, Ioane celebrates his try with a little wave to the crowd. After thumping his chest twice, he calms and his arm pulls up straight and signals to the roaring crowd as a smile sloshes across his face. It would seem wrong to describe the actions of any winger who is 6ft 2in and around 16st as ‘cute’, but in the moment he radiates innocence.It is for that reason that you want him to make the most of his talents while he has his home comforts, his candy store mentality. Although he is always competitive with Akira – in the 2016 Mitre 10 Cup, Rieko beat 62 defenders to Akira’s 59 to top that particular stats table – he claims he doesn’t look at the numbers, he just plays. You may not believe that, and there’s cause to doubt that someone lighting up the stats panels would ever ignore the figures. However, the youngest Ioane already expects improvements in his game.Finding his feet: Playing for the Blues in Super RugbyWhen pushed on what he has to work on, he leads us along as he thinks out loud.“I think it’s everything. All we’ve done so far is all good but I’ve got to keep working. I hope to get a bit bigger, a bit faster and fitter. I can work on tackle technique and the breakdown. The list of work-ons is bigger than the list of things I am good at.”That is a good stock answer for your average 20-year-old. He feels his life is just like most kids, happily explaining that away from the field his girlfriend pretty much looks after him or that his downtime is spent on the PlayStation or at the movies. We know he benefits from the care provided at home. But he is not your normal 20-year-old, is he?International rugby has not looked uncomfortable for him. Nor has fielding questions from a stranger. He has seen some of the world and had some of its best rugby players hurled at him. There is more to see, in more ways than one. Try to hold on to the image of the little wave and the happy family life. Because he will be back out there punishing flat-footed wingers soon enough. It could get more frightening. New Zealand’s latest wonder wing Rieko Ioane tells Alan Dymock why he’s loving life with the All Blacks. This feature first appeared in the December issue of Rugby World magazine. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The most terrifying attacker from the recent Rugby Championship still lives with his mum and dad.On 35 occasions during the competition, All Black stripling Rieko Ioane ghosted past would-be tacklers from Argentina, Australia and South Africa, spooking them on his way to five tournament tries – joint-top of the charts, with Israel Folau. He also led for metres made, with 649. Despite his impish demeanour and lack of Test experience, he was ruthless.It was a similar story during the British & Irish Lions tour of New Zealand, when six minutes into his first match against the tourists, for Auckland Blues, Ioane scorched past Jack Nowell to score.He failed to shine for the Maori All Blacks against the Lions, but was up to his best again for the first Test of the tour. After being picked for New Zealand ahead of try-scoring machine Julian Savea, he scored two of his own. The first was an embarrassing moment for the visitors as the 20-year-old wing caught a bouncing ball that the Lions back three looked petrified to go near, before pulling away from Elliot Daly, who dived towards him in vain.Sliding in: Ioane scoring for the Blues against the LionsFearless and in near-peerless form out wide, the world lies at Rieko’s feet. But it can stay there for now as he reclines at home with mum Sandra, dad Eddie, brother Akira and French bulldog Echo.“It saves a lot more money!” Ioane jokes, when asked why he hasn’t left the nest. “It makes everything simpler, being at Mum and Dad’s. There’s always food on the table, the washing machine’s always going, you go to training but then you come back and go to bed… People can look at it and say, ‘You guys should move out.’ But we’re still only young. It’s only in sport I am excelling. It makes life easier.“Rugby can be for a short time. Having a strong connection with your family is important. Your friends and family drive you on. And obviously one day we have to help provide for Mum and Dad.”If you are part of the rugby scene in Auckland you should know the Ioanes. Father Eddie played for Samoa, mother Sandra Wihongi played for the Black Ferns, but it’s at the Ponsonby club where they’re ingrained now and Sandra serves as club manager. She made news herself during the Lions tour when she adopted a fan, Alex Edwards. Ioane laughs looking back: “Mum said we had Alex staying and I said, ‘Oh yeah… (wait) who’s Alex?!’ Next thing you know, everyone’s in the paper. She’d probably bring home a whole contingent of Lions supporters if she could!”In rugby terms, the youngest Ioane and his 22-year-old back-row brother, Akira, have great examples at home. Honesty is at the bedrock of their interactions about the game. If he has a bad performance, Rieko knows his parents and friends will point it out. Mess up and a few texts will be coming his way.FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HEREHe also has plenty of role models at his franchise to rely on, explaining that extra help from those he trusts is what “gets me over the line” in the still-sometimes surreal world of elite sport. Both brothers have gone from NPC rugby to Olympic sevens, and now Rieko is a try-greedy All Black. The speed of the ascent does surprise him.“My brother and Sonny Bill Williams have given me the most help,” Ioane tells Rugby World. “A handful of coaches have also been helping me, individually. Sonny Bill and I have talked ever since we were involved with the sevens together. We’re good mates.”Fan favourite: After the first Lions Test, at Eden ParkWilliams has been around the block a few times and has shone on several stages, so Rieko knows that an honest view from the blockbuster centre can hold profundity. As for Akira, they certainly see a lot of each other. Rieko jokes that as they live and train together, the only time they’re apart is when they’re asleep. “Even if he isn’t going to admit it, he still follows me around!” he says mischievously.Most of the world’s Test sides are still following the All Blacks. Some expected the world champions to be scratching around as if they had lost their keys after the departure of so many Test veterans following World Cup 2015. Instead, they have pumped in some newbies amongst the veterans – as the statistics on these pages show. The team have pioneered a mentorship programme of sorts – Ioane, for example, has no fear of touring Europe this month because he travelled with the All Blacks last year and was blooded off the bench.While this is a nice wee introduction to the thrum and bluster of Internationals, though, the New Zealand coaches will not shy away from slipping in someone like Ioane or lock Scott Barrett or fly-half Richie Mo’unga, should injury or form demand a change. They are fully invested in the old saying about a young player being old enough when they show they are good enough. “In a couple of years I’ll be a better player than I am today,” Ioane says, almost as if it’s just occurred to him.This feature first appeared in the December issue of Rugby World magazine.last_img read more

Former All Blacks boss Steve Hansen takes up NRL role

first_imgCan’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. All smiles: Former All Blacks boss Steve Hansen (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Former All Blacks boss Steve Hansen has signed on to help out the NRL’s Canterbury-Bankstown Bulldogs as a high performance consultant.Hansen left his New Zealand post after Rugby World Cup 2019, with the All Blacks finishing third. The coach – who also works with Toyota Verblitz in Japan – led his country to the Webb Ellis trophy in 2015 and was assistant to Graham Henry when the All Blacks took the world title on home soil, in 2011.Bulldogs Chief Executive Andrew Hill said of the latest piece of coaching recruitment: “Being able to bring Steve Hansen on board as a High Performance Consultant with the club is tremendous news for everyone associated with the Bulldogs as he is one of the most highly respected figures throughout all of sports.Related: Should Australian rugby outbid NRL for teenage stars like Joseph Suaalii?“Steve will work closely with our Coaching and Management staff, in addition to our Players Leadership Group.center_img “To be able to have someone with Steve’s record and background work with our staff and players will be a great asset to our club.“He was responsible for being a major driving force behind one of the most successful sporting brands in history and his knowledge and thoughts on areas such as leadership, high performance, preparation and team ethic will be invaluable to our club as we look to create the right environment for success, on and off the field.“Steve has already developed a relationship with Trent Barrett (Bulldogs coach), after Trent spent some time with the All Blacks in recent seasons and we believe that his knowledge and insights will be of tremendous benefit moving forward.” The World Cup-winner has joined the Bulldogslast_img read more

West Africa set to have two provinces, two archbishops

first_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 West Africa set to have two provinces, two archbishops An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Press Release In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL Anglican Communion Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Events Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group [Anglican Communion News Service] The Church of the Province of West Africa has revealed that it is holding a special synod at the end of September to adopt a constitutional change that will see the creation of two provinces with two archbishops.The Rev. Canon Anthony Eiwuley, provincial secretary, said that the church will be meeting at Cuttington University in Liberia Sept. 27-29 for a special synod.“At this synod, we shall be adopting an amendment to our constitution to give room for the establishment of two administrative provinces,” he said. “One to contain all the dioceses in Ghana and the other, the rest of the six dioceses in Gambia, Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Cameroon.“Each of the smaller provinces will then elect an administrative archbishop and out of the two, one will be elected the primate of the province.”The current primate, the Most Rev. Justice Akrofi, retires on Oct. 29 when he reaches the mandatory retirement age of 70.Eiwuley added, “We seek for the prayers of the entire communion.” Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA By ACNS staffPosted Sep 4, 2012 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Shreveport, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Africa, The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books last_img read more

Candlemas and ‘Dia de la Candelaria’ shine in new light

first_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA February 5, 2013 at 4:21 pm Trinity Episcopal Church of Ashland, Oregon, celebrated Candlemas for the second time this last Saturday, February 2nd. It was better attended this second year and was a lovely, meaningful service, the blessing of candles for all the variety of services we offer and a celebration of Christ’s Presentation in the Temple. We began in the Trinity Garden labyrinth and made our way by candlelight into the sanctuary where the majority of the service took place. The incense was smokin’! Youth Minister Lorton, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Music Morristown, NJ February 5, 2013 at 11:55 pm My wife Sandra and I attended the Candlemas Evensong of the “fiesty” Sisters of Saint Margaret in Duxbury, Mass. It ws a lovely, peaceful, and spiritual time of worship, most thoughtfully planned and prepared. Three readings from the relevant texts in Luke, each followed by a “reflection” by local priests (one of whom was the Superior of the Sisters). Together with hymn and chant well done and prayer, all in an atmosphere of quiet peace. It was a wonderful and beneficial oasis of serenity, a joy after a vey busy day. It was followed by a simple and tasty supper provided by the sisters. Their feistiness is matched by their down-to-earth friendliness and joy. A blessed time. Rector Collierville, TN Featured Events Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Knoxville, TN Mary Goshert says: Fr J Greeer says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Presentation of Christ at the Temple by Hans Holbein the Elder, 1500–01 (Kunsthalle, Hamburg). Source: The Yorck Project: 10.000 Meisterwerke der Malerei. Distributed by DIRECTMEDIA Publishing GmbH[Episcopal News Service] Comedy Central TV personality Stephen Colbert has bemoaned the loss of “the true meaning of Candlemas,” but a group of nuns in Massachusetts and others across the nation are creating new ways to revive and to celebrate the time-honored celebration.Also called the Feast of the Presentation of the Lord, Candlemas falls on Feb. 2 and is the Christian festival marking the ritual presentation of Jesus in the temple in Jerusalem, during which prophets Simeon and Anna proclaimed him the Messiah. Simeon spoke the prayer known as the “Nunc Dimittis,” calling the baby “a light to lighten the gentiles.” The date is 40 days after the birth of Christ when he, like all Jewish boys, was taken to the temple to be presented to God and when his mother Mary was declared “clean.”In Europe, the festival traditionally was marked by the blessing of candles for use in churches and homes, giving it the common name of Candle-mass. For many, it was regarded as the midpoint of winter. In the United States, it became known as “Groundhog Day,” where Punxsutawney Phil’s shadow reportedly predicts how much longer winter will last — prompting Colbert to lament that the Christian holiday had been “all ground-hogged up and commercialized.”Sister Adele Marie Ryan, superior of the Society of St. Margaret in Duxbury, Massachusetts, said that the order had celebrated Candlemas since 1855; this year the community braved frosty temperatures, the threat of snow, Super Bowl competition and a variation of the traditional ceremony to host a Feb. 3 afternoon celebration.“We had had some snow in the morning, and there was more forecast for the evening, but we still had a total of 41 in the congregation and it went very, very nicely,” said Ryan during a Feb. 4 telephone interview.The celebration was “a bit of a takeoff on the traditional ceremonies,” she added. It included Scripture, reflections, music and plainchant – a big draw – and was crafted as an Evening Prayer liturgy “to be ecumenical – and it was,” drawing from the larger community, she said.But rather than at the beginning, the candles were blessed and distributed at the conclusion of the service, the symbolism being that, “having listened to the Scripture readings and reflections and sung the hymns, then the people have encountered Christ in the light and they carry the candles out into the world as people who are bearing the light of Christ,” she said.‘Our stories are bridges’In downtown Los Angeles, the traditional Candlemas observance merged with the Hispanic tradition of “el Día de la Candelaria,” where families traditionally dress the “niño dios” (infant Jesus figurine) from their nativity set in a new outfit and bring it to the church to be blessed, said the Rev. Frank Alton, priest-in-charge of the Cathedral congregation of St. Athanasius.Sheniffer Aldana, 28, who attends St. Mary’s Church in Los Angeles, said she brought a niño dios to the St. Athanasius ceremony to be blessed because she wanted to be more traditional, she said. Others brought candles to be blessed.“Feb. 2 is between Christmas and Lent and it’s a bit of a down time, but it ends the Advent-Christmas-Epiphany cycle and it’s significant in the Spanish part of this community. It seemed like a way to reach out to the larger community … [with] folktales from different communities,” said Alton.During the service, Alton announced that he just had received word that a parishioner was in the hospital giving birth. “So, the story comes alive.”“A lot of the folks in our congregation have assumed that el Día de la Candelaria is only a Latin American tradition because they’ve been the only ones who’ve celebrated it here,” he added. “So to hear stories from Europe and to worship in English and Spanish opened their eyes.“That’s what I’m wanting to do, to create this sense of openness to each other and to realize our stories are the bridges we will use to connect with each other.”There was, for example, the story of how Candlemas became a matchmaker for Roger Leachman, 70, who serves as the judge of elections during annual convention meetings of the Diocese of Los Angeles.“When I was just a wee lad growing up in Scotland … part of the way through winter the teacher would come in, and all the children, we all got new candles,” he told the gathering.The teacher explained that “Candlemas was halfway through winter, halfway from the shortest day to the day when the days and nights were the same … and [that it] was 40 days after Christmas, when the baby Jesus was first taken to the temple,” said Leachman, wearing a traditional Scottish red-and-green tartan kilt.To mark the occasion, schoolchildren contributed their allowances so the teacher could buy sweets and biscuits and cakes throughout the school year, he explained. “The lass and the lad who brought the most money were made the king and queen of the class.”“We would carry them out after class. We’d cross our hands and make a seat and carry them out, and they had privileges. The king and queen would each determine one afternoon when we didn’t have school, when we’d have a half-day off. They could also declare anyone who was due punishment was relieved of that punishment. You could make some real good friends that way.”After saving enough to become the class king at age 13, he rescued a certain young lady named Maggie from detention. “Years later, I bumped into her and she remembered me,” he recalled. “She asked me out, and we went dancing. The relationship grew so much that Maggie and I got married on Feb. 2 to commemorate the day that I made the first move.“To this day, when we celebrate our wedding anniversary, we take candles to be blessed by the priest, and we have them on the table for our anniversary meal.”An ecumenical celebrationAs with the sisters of St. Margaret, ecumenism figured prominently in services in the Diocese of Chicago, where the choirs of Grace Episcopal and First Lutheran Church in Freeport collaborated on a Feb. 2 multigenerational celebration, said Steve McMillen, Grace’s music director and organist.“This is a new innovation,” McMillen said during a recent telephone interview from his home. “Nobody can remember that they’ve ever had a Candlemas service in church in the last 20 years.”Their hybrid Evening Prayer/Lessons and Carols service commemorated both the presentation of Jesus in the temple and Simeon’s song celebrating Jesus as a light for revelation, a basis for the blessing and distribution of candles, McMillen said.After a meal and an educational program about the meaning of Candlemas, youth and adult participants made candles using beeswax sheets and wicks to be blessed and taken home, he said.It was “a neat chance to do something different” and to celebrate in the local context the full communion relationship between the Episcopal Church and Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, he added.During the Los Angeles service Lulú Hernandez shared that she grew up in Mexico, watching her grandmother invest a great deal of love and creativity while sewing clothes for the baby Jesus “during the month of January so that it would be ready for presentation at the church on Feb. 2.”“I was always proud to take our niño dios to church for the presentation every Feb. 2,” she said in Spanish. “I always thought our niños dios was the most beautiful in the whole community.“The truth is that I didn’t understand much about Candlemas at that time; but I knew that it had something to do with the end of the 40 days Mary, the mother of Jesus, had to stay home after Jesus was born,” she said, referring to the ritual of Mary’s purification after childbirth that also is observed at Candlemas.“I knew about the 40 days because after my little brother was born, my mom didn’t leave the house for 40 days. I remember that one of her first outings was to the church to thank God for her baby. The priest raised my brother at the altar to present him to God. I figured something like this was the way Jesus was presented in the temple centuries ago.”Elaine Sands narrated a story from Ireland about how Candlemas evolved from the celebration of the festival of Brigid, “the Great Mother Goddess, the goddess of fire, poetry and healing … all things that go along with the creative powers of the onset of spring.”The festival also is known as “Imbolc,” Gaelic word for “ewe-milk … because this is the time of year when lambs were born in Ireland, so of course it is also when the mother ewes’ milk starts to flow again in order to feed them,” she said.Eventually, the church adapted the festival, transformed Brigid “from goddess to saint, and the name of the festival changed from Imbolc to Candlemas,” she said. One custom was to celebrate Candlemas by filling a basket with soft grass and flower petals to make a “bride’s bed.” And children made corn dolls to lay in the bed.The custom was, when the bed was ready, that “all the generations of women in the family opened the front door of the house and invited Brigid to enter,” she said.For Sofía Gonzalez, “the pride of my people is that our festival was started after the Virgin herself appeared in 1392 in my hometown called Candelaria in the Canary Islands of Spain.”“The celebration lasted a whole week, culminating on Feb. 2,” she said. Before moving to the United States, she recalled, her hometown’s parades included “clowns dressed as peasants pushing artificial wooden bulls, complete with horns, while bullfighters dressed in colorful silk pants with strings attached and paper flowers acted out ‘bullfights’ along the route. There were also bands playing music and … all civil and military authorities of the city dressed in full dress.”The parade ended at the Basilica of Candelaria, where worshipers placed candles at the altar and shared Eucharist before processing to the plaza to celebrate. “My parents let me drink some sangria, symbolizing the blood of the bull.”Now, living in the United States, she added, “I miss these parts of my culture.”— The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. Candlemas and ‘Dia de la Candelaria’ shine in new light Traditions of evolving ancient celebration act as bridges between cultures Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID February 5, 2013 at 11:42 pm On a winter visit to England, I noticed that some of churches kept the creche up until Candlemas, a tradition we’ve adopted in our home. Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate Diocese of Nebraska Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Catherine Windsor says: By Pat McCaughanPosted Feb 5, 2013 Featured Jobs & Calls Rev. William Underhill says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA January 30, 2016 at 8:26 pm Hi Sarah, This February 2nd will be my 36th anniversary of ordination also. Bishop Rusack of Los Angeles asked me if I had a preference for a day to be ordained, and I asked for the Feast of the Presentation, and it just happened to be a free day on his calendar.Bless you!center_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Tampa, FL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Kate Adamson says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Comments (7) Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Press Release Service Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY February 5, 2013 at 4:59 pm Nice article. Candlemas has long been a favorite feast day for me. This year the Feast of the Presentation marked the 51st anniversary of the ordination to the Episcopal Priesthood of my late father, Sylvester M. Vaughan. Also, I am most pleased to be a Priest Associate of that “feisty order of nuns” the Society of Saint Margaret. The Revd Sarah V. Lewis says: Margaret Irwin says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ February 9, 2013 at 2:38 pm Kate, my sister, Canon Kitty, now lives in Taylor Hall where the sisters used to live. She is 7 years older than me, and my favorite memory of Candlemas (which was in today’s Crossword) was of the two of us walking home trying to keep the candles lit. She alaways did, but I needed to be relit from time to time. Now Ive been a priest for 54 years and the last time I blessed candles was in Plymouth, In in l976. I now belong to The Rowfant CLub, a bookclub whose primary feast day is Candlemas. Lets all relight. Amen Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET February 6, 2013 at 8:39 am So glad to see that the Feast of the Purification was included at the end of the article . The Patronal Festival of The Sisters of St. Mary was always a gala event at their school, now long gone, Kemper Hall. A lovely memory of candles at services, and a festive lunch for the school, complete with blue water glasses! Rector Bath, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Smithfield, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ last_img read more

Un proyecto de narraciones de prisión transforma vidas y educa…

first_img Las reclusas entraban y salían del salón multiusos del centro correccional en fila india y con las manos cruzadas a la espalda para la representación interna de Relatos de adentro hacia afuera [Stories from the Inside Out]. Entre dos prisiones y centros correccionales comunitarios, hay 17.259 mujeres encarceladas en Arkansas, según el Departamento Correccional del estado. Foto de Lynette Wilson para ENS.[Episcopal News Service] Las palabras que salen de las cinco actrices pueden ser difíciles de oír. No porque se trate de obscenidades, de las cuales no hay muchas; son las descripciones de abandono, abuso, desamparo, adicción y pérdida padecidos por 12 mujeres encarceladas lo que les resulta abrumador a los que escuchan.Son las palabras como las que empleaba una mujer que reflexiona sobre el suicidio de su hermana; la pared ensangrentada; el sofá dejado al borde de la acera para que lo recoja la basura. Todo lo que queda de una vida.O las de una madre que, al salir de una cama empapada en sudor, necesita encerrarse en el baño y encontrarse una vena que no estuviera colapsada para inyectarse la metadona antes de poder darles el desayuno a los niños que esperan hambrientos y desesperados por captar su atención.Son las palabras de las mujeres que, dos veces a la semana durante cuatro meses, trabajaron con narradores, poetas, compositores y artistas para ahondar en las grietas tenebrosas, y llegar a las partes de sí mismas y de sus recuerdos de infancia que guardan el dolor y el sufrimiento, tanto padecido como cometido, y ponerlo todo en el papel.A mediados de noviembre, las actrices leyeron las palabras de las mujeres a unas 230 personas reunidas en la iglesia episcopal de San Pablo [St. Paul’s Episcopal Church] en Fayetteville, Arkansas. Era la tercera vez que el Proyecto de Relatos de Prisión del Noroeste de Arkansas montaba una representación de  “Relatos de adentro hacia afuera” en San Pablo, que adoptó el proyecto en 2012. El día antes, el 14 de noviembre, las actrices hicieron una lectura para las 12 mujeres que participaron en la tercera ronda del proyecto y para sus compañeras reclusas dentro del centro correccional comunitario.Kathy McGregor, la directora del programa, llevó el proyecto narrativo a Fayetteville en 2011, desde Memphis, Tennessee, donde una colega enfermera y narradora, Elaine Blanchard, había comenzado un proyecto de narraciones de prisión en el condado de Shelby.“Hay una fuerza en el relato y una fuerza particular en aprender a contar tu propia historia y en repetírtela de nuevo”, dijo McGregor.Kathy McGregor, directora del Proyecto de Relatos de Prisión del Noroeste de Arkansas, presenta un certificado a una de las 12 narradoras que participaron de la representación de Relatos de adentro hacia afuera el 14 de noviembre en el Centro Correccional Comunitario del Noroeste de Arkansas en Fayetteville. Foto de Lynette Wilson para ENS.A lo largo del período de cuatro meses que duró la preparación del programa, los temas comienzan por desarrollarse a partir de ejercicios de mapeo de vida, inspiraciones de escritura poética, canciones y otras lecturas. El texto de las mujeres se reduce luego al tamaño de una representación.Madres e hijos estuvieron debatiendo muchísimo, y las mujeres querían profundizar, explorar sus propias historias y las historias de otros, dijo la directora de redacción Katie Nichol. Ella obtuvo una maestría en bellas artes de la Universidad de Arkansas, vino al proyecto de narración en julio de 2012 como artista visitante y se quedó.“A veces puede ser realmente duro cuando uno oye contar historias llenas de dolor”, dijo Nichol. “Y luego puedes presentarles un poema y observarlas como van de no entender nada a analizarlo en un nivel universitario”.Una representación ‘interna’El Centro Correccional Comunitario del Noroeste de Arkansas que alberga a las participantes parece un hogar de convalecientes, un edificio de bajo puntal situado en la intersección de la calle Spring y de la avenida College en el centro de Fayetteville, una ciudad universitaria. Las 100 mujeres viven allí, 97 por ciento de las cuales son blancas y todas están cumpliendo sentencias por delitos no violentos. La mayoría, si no todas, tienen una cosa en común: [han sido víctimas de] abuso emocional, físico o sexual, o de una combinación de abusos y abandono.Antes de que comenzara la representación del centro, las actrices repasaron sus parlamentos en un cuartito que queda al lado del salón multiusos donde las reclusas se reunirían más tarde. A las 12 mujeres cuyos relatos se cuentan se les dijo que ensayaran la canción “Quebrantada” [Broken] con la músico Shannon Wurst.“Soy más fuerte de lo que creía ser” dijo “Zaria Ezra” (a cada una de las mujeres se les dio un “nombre artístico” por razones de confidencialidad), de 25 años, que está cumpliendo su noveno mes de encierro por haber violado la libertad condicional relacionada con previas sanciones por drogas. “He pasado muchísimo”.Hija de padres divorciados, Zaria Ezra dijo que ella había sobrevivido al abandono, la sobredosis letal de drogas de un chico de 19 años que era su novio y, después de que éste muriera, una tendencia personal a sabotear todas las relaciones con los hombres. “Yo los dejaba antes de que me dejaran”, dijo durante una entrevista en el cuarto de ensayos.Zaria Ezra espera salir del centro antes de Navidad. Tiene planes de regresar a vivir con su familia en Bentonville, donde se encuentra la casa matriz de Walmart, comenzar a rehacer sus relaciones y a trabajar como cosmetóloga, mientras se somete a tratamientos de quimioterapia para tratarse la Hepatitis C que contrajo a través del uso de drogas intravenosas.El proyecto de relatos de la prisión, afirmó, la ayudó a liberarse de la “atadura mental” asociada con ocultarse de los demás.“Ya no me escondo, le cuento mi historia a todo el mundo”, dijo. “Eso me ha ayudado a tener más confianza en mí misma. No tengo nada que ocultar”.Antes de la actuación, las reclusas, todas ellas con batas amarillas de la prisión, entraron en fila india, con las manos cruzadas a la espalda, en el salón gris claro, de bloques y bajo puntal, del sótano del centro correccional. Hablaban mientras la canción “Settlin’ del dúo Sugarland se escuchaba de fondo: “No me voy a tranzar por nada menos que el todo”.  Cuando se acabaron las sillas, las mujeres cruzaron el salón y trajeron suficientes sillas para añadir otras tres hileras.Luego vino el recuento —uno, dos, tres, cuatro— cada mujer se sentaba luego de ser contada, hasta que la última respondió al número “92”. Después otras dos mujeres entraron apresuradamente. Un hombre envió por radio el resultado del conteo final. Seis mujeres no asistirían a la obra; algunas estaban cumpliendo con deberes laborales, y otras puede que estuvieran enfermas, dijo Gary Tabor, el alcaide auxiliar. A través de la obra, uno podía ver la influencia de la poesía, desde “Todo lo que sé cabe en una jeringuilla de 100cc” hasta el poema “Todo lo que sabes” [All You Know] de Carol Ann Davis, pasando por “Ciudad de mi regreso” [Town of my Return] de Allison Seay.Las 12 narradoras se sentaron juntas durante la lectura. El llanto contenido de las narradoras, sus compañeras reclusas, el personal del centro correccional y los invitados se mantenía a la par de la banda sonora. Cuando la obra terminó, las 94 mujeres salieron del salón de la misma manera en que habían entrado, en fila india y con las manos cruzadas a la espalda.Tabor celebró el proyecto de la narración por su impacto positivo en las participantes.En las planillas de evaluación después del programa del 14 de noviembre, algunas de las participantes confirmaron ese criterio.“Me ayudó a darme cuenta de que soy una sobreviviente”, dijo una mujer.“Me ayudó a sacar de mí algunos resentimientos que había estado albergando durante años”, expresó otra. “Escribir es un gran recurso para enfrentar situaciones difíciles”.Ella recomendaría el proyecto a otros, continuó, “porque les exigirá, en primer lugar, que se enfrenten con las terribles realidades que los llevaron a las drogas y otras adicciones. De modo que puede que se aparten de ese estilo de vida”.El proyecto narrativo se ajusta a la filosofía de la alcaidesa Maggie Capel para el centro correccional comunitario, el cual, a diferencia de una prisión de mayor rigor, se propone inducir un cambio en la vida de las reclusas y ayudarles en su transición para reinsertarse en la sociedad.“Todas se han sentido muy conmovidas”, dijo Capel, refiriéndose a la lectura interna. “Resultó muy reveladora para ellas oír su propia historia contada por terceros”.También puede resultar muy reveladora para los que la escuchen “afuera”.Retratos de las 12 narradoras tomados por el fotógrafo local Andrew Kilgore colgaban de la pared en la iglesia episcopal de San Pablo durante la representación externa y fueron puestas en atriles de madera detrás de las actrices durante el programa interno. Foto de Lynette Wilson para ENS.El programa impreso que se distribuyó la noche siguiente en San Pablo explicaba el propósito del evento: Todo el mundo tiene una historia y cuando a las personas les dan la oportunidad de escuchar las historias de otras tenemos menos probabilidades de deshumanizarnos mutuamente con estereotipos.Este show no fue tan brutal como lo fueron los dos anteriores; está más matizado, dijo Erika Wilhite, directora teatral del proyecto.“Tal vez es uno de los mejores”, enfatizó ella. “La tarea más difícil consiste en no darle cabida al melodrama; si es demasiado gráfico, el público se distanciará”.El programa de San Pablo tenía dos objetivos, añadió McGregor: ayudar a la gente a darse cuenta de que, bajo diferentes circunstancias, los relatos de las mujeres podrían ser su propia historia y mostrarles que la trayectoria que culmina en la cárcel no tiene lugar en un vacío y que el abuso tiene secuelas. Haga clic aquí para ver el programa completo —destinado a un público maduro— en San Pablo.En los años cincuenta, cuando la familia era sagrada y McGregor crecía en Auburn, Alabama, el abuso no se ventilaba, afirmó ella. Hoy en día se ventila, pero sigue ocurriendo.Sin embargo, las mujeres afectadas no se ven a sí mismas como víctimas, ni establecen necesariamente la conexión entre el abuso sufrido en la infancia y las decisiones que tomaron y que las condujeron a la encarcelación, afirmó McGregor. De diversos modos, agregó, el proyecto narrativo es una “exploración”: “¿qué me ocurrió de manera diferente?”.Las actuaciones de noviembre también ofrecieron una oportunidad para la reflexión a la actriz Laura Shatkus, nativa de Chicago que labora en una maestría de la Universidad de Arkansas. Mirando a su niñez en comparación a las de estas mujeres “de haber tomado decisiones diferentes o de haber tenido otros padres”, señaló, sus historias podrían haber sido la suya.Una transición desde la cárcelTrabajando exitosamente con tres grupos de reclusas, McGregor y otros voluntarios que participaron en el proyecto han identificado una necesidad que transciende la narración.“Nos hemos llegado a encariñar con 36 mujeres [3 grupos de a 12], hemos llegado a estar muy cerca”, dijo McGregor. “Algunas de las mujeres provienen de situaciones muy abusivas y no tienen adonde ir, salvo regresar a la situación abusiva. Hemos perdido a algunas por la adicción a la metadona y a las bebidas alcohólicas”.De manera que el próximo paso en el ministerio de prisión de San Pablo es brindar un hogar transicional donde las mujeres puedan vivir al salir de la prisión mientras reorganizan sus vidas.Para recalcar la necesidad de un hogar transicional, McGregor compartió la historia de una ex participante en el proyecto narrativo y notable compositora de canciones, que sucumbió a sus adicciones.En detalles, vívidos y escuetos, la mujer, que creció sin electricidad ni agua corriente, recordaba cómo se sintió cuando su madre la agarró por el pelo con tal fuerza que le separó el cuero cabelludo del cráneo; lo difícil que fue correr y mantenerse al ritmo de sus hermanos mientras llevaba puestos dos zapatos izquierdos; y los años de abuso sexual a que fue sometida por un hermano mayor, hasta el día en que ella se puso a gritar y él dejó de hacerlo.La mujer, que está en su veintena y que tiene tres hijos, fue puesta en libertad bajo palabra y regresó al ambiente de la misma familia y finalmente retornó a la drogadicción, dijo McGregor a ENS durante una entrevista en una cafetería de Fayetteville.“Es por eso que quiero una casa de transición”, subrayó.Es un tema que le toca de cerca.“No sé por qué yo no terminé en la cárcel”, dijo McGregor, narradora desde hace tiempo, enfermera parroquial y organizadora sindical que ahora trabaja como enfermera de hospicio en un hospital de la Administración de Veteranos que queda cerca. “Soporté terribles abusos”.Tanto la madre como el padrastro de McGregor fueron abusadores, en tanto su padre biológico se mantuvo ausente. Fue mediante la terapia que ella “ahondó” en su propia infancia, llegando a enojarse con su padre y a no hablar con él durante unos cuantos años.“¿Dónde se encuentra el espacio para procesar cuando regresas a la misma situación?”, preguntó.El Centro Correccional Comunitario del Noroeste de Arkansas está localizado en la intersección de la calle Spring y la avenida College en el centro de Fayetteville. Foto de Lynette Wilson para ENS.San Pablo ha incluido fondos iniciales para el hogar transicional en su campaña de mayordomía para 2014. En octubre, McGregor, Nichol y la Rda. Suzanne Stoner, sacerdote asociada en San Pablo, asistieron a la primera Conferencia Nacional de Thistle Farms  en Nashville, Tennessee, para interconectarse con otros que trabajan con poblaciones de mujeres semejantes y aprenden a dirigir un hogar.“No se trata de un hogar transicional, se trata de un momento en un movimiento”, dijo Stoner, que es celebrante regular, junto con el Rdo. Lowell Grisham, rector de San Pablo, en una eucaristía que se celebra semanalmente en el centro correccional.La respuesta de la congregación al proyecto narrativo ha sido positiva, dijo Grisham, aunque agregó que su asistencia a las representaciones no lo había impresionado demasiado.“Hay renuencia e intimidación cuando nos enfrentamos con algo profundo y terrible”, dijo.A lo cual Stoner añadió, “uno tiene que estar dispuesto a tener los ojos abiertos”.Para la feligresa Debbie Griffin, consejera profesional en una escuela secundaria alternativa, los relatos de las mujeres son los relatos de los adolescentes a los que ella atiende, muchos de los cuales ya son padres y madres.Parte de su trabajo, dijo, es “deshacer el daño y romper el patrón que les ha sido impuesto por sus familias y por las circunstancias.“Es difícil sobreponerse a eso” afirmó. “Son víctimas de algo mayor que ellos mismos… el abuso es el denominador común”.“Essence”, de 28 años y otra de las narradoras, fue víctima de abusos físicos y mentales a manos de su madre, soltera y alcohólica, y creció en un hogar de acogida. El tomar parte en el proyecto narrativo la ayudó a vencer montones de problemas, según dijo.“Al compartirlo y escribirlo, no tengo que seguirlo viviendo”, expresó. “Todas las decisiones [erróneas] que tomé dependieron de mi infancia”.La revocación de una libertad bajo palabra trajo a Essence al centro correccional. Dijo que ella esperaba que la liberaran en marzo, cuando planeaba reunirse con sus hijos, un varón de 5 años y una niña de 9, que actualmente viven con la madre de ella, que aún sigue bebiendo “pero no tanto”, en Misisipí. Essence traerá a los niños con ella para Arkansas.“Me sentí bien, fue como una realización” dijo Essence luego de la lectura interna. “Ahora tengo la motivación para hacer lo que tenga que hacer”.– Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Rector Bath, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Press Release Service An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Job Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Un proyecto de narraciones de prisión transforma vidas y educa a la comunidad Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH center_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Press Release Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Por Lynette WilsonPosted Dec 9, 2013 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Belleville, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Events Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL last_img read more

Anglican Church in Burundi provides aid to flood disaster victims

first_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI By Bellah ZuluPosted Feb 21, 2014 Anglican Communion Director of Music Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL Anglican Church in Burundi provides aid to flood disaster victims Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Albany, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit an Event Listing Submit a Job Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Anglican Church in Burundi distributes charcoal so flood victims can cook food. Photo: Nasasagare Guy/Anglican Church of Burundi[Anglican Communion News Service] The Anglican Church in Burundi has joined the government and other aid agencies in the country in providing aid to victims of the flood disaster that hit the country’s capital Bujumbura about two weeks ago.Nasasagare Guy, a member of the church’s communications team, told ACNS in an interview today: “The church here is still dealing with emergency situation. We’re responding to the needs of the victims by providing food and clothing donated by Christians in our church.”On the night of Feb. 9, Bujumbura experienced what the locals felt were some of the “heaviest thunderstorms and rainfall in contemporary history.” More than 150 people were reported dead and hundreds were injured after the torrential rains washed whole hillsides away.With the heavy floods, fire for cooking and keeping warm has been a problem. The Anglican Diocese of Makamba, has been distributing charcoal to those affected by the devastating floods.“Christians world over are encouraged to assist in any way they can,” said Guy. “So far the response has been good with some people making monetary contributions and others helping out in the camps.”He added, “The Anglican Church here is working with other churches and organizations to look at ways of coordinating aid activities so that together, we can bring substantial aid.”Burundi Red Cross, some civil society organizations, churches and families are trying their best to supply provisions to victims. Among items urgently needed are temporary shelters, clothes and blankets, medicines, drinking water, food and cooking equipment.The floods were so devastating with a lot killed and many others injured. Unofficial figures indicate that more than 1000 houses were washed away leaving an estimated 2,500 households affected and about 20,000 people without shelter. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Africa, An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Events Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN last_img read more

RIP: The Rev. Gary P. Fertig

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis October 17, 2014 at 8:14 pm They each were an integral part of helping me find the God I continue to seek. Both Gary & John taught me to be open and to explore and to know the love and joy that came with being an Episcopalian. It is hard to conceive however, that Gary is gone at such young age. I so agree with Marilyn Finklea, that the tears are what we are left with for the loss of both these exceptional priests. October 19, 2014 at 1:00 pm Truly a loss for the Episcopal Church. Stranger still is that Bishop Tom Shaw died around the same time! May the rest in peace and rise in glory! Danielle A, Gaherty says: Submit a Job Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Livingston Prescott Humboldt IV says: October 8, 2014 at 5:00 pm A fine priest and a fine man. I remember him well from St. Thomas. Rest eternal. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Bath, NC Comments (8) October 10, 2014 at 7:52 pm There are no words….Just tears. May he rest in peace and rise in Glory. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Albany, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments are closed. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Jeremiah J. de Michaelis says: October 27, 2014 at 12:59 pm Fr. Fertig was a marvelous priest who graciously consented to officiate at my wedding to Alice Preston Hord in 1986. We had decided to elope to NYC ( after much advanced planning), so officiating for two strangers was something he needn’t have done. We always appreciated his kindness and pray for the repose of his soul. May he rest in peace and rise in glory with the saints. J de M The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Rev. Gary P. Fertig, rector of The Church of The Ascension in Chicago until his retirement in 2012, has died aged 62.A former vicar of Saint Thomas Fifth Avenue in New York and teacher at the choir school, Fertig was a graduate of Nashotah House Seminary.Fertig will be buried in Ann Arbor, Michigan on Friday, Oct. 10 at 10 a.m. A Requiem Mass will be said by the Rev. David Cobb, rector of Ascension, at 7:30 a.m. on Oct. 10, prior to Fertig’s burial.A notice from Church of the Ascension is available here. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Smithfield, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem RIP: The Rev. Gary P. Fertig M. E. Finklea says: center_img Obituary, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET People Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Revd Canon Dr Huntingdon Willmott Faversham-Greaves LXIII says: Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA Livingston Prescott Humboldt IV says: Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Tags Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL December 27, 2014 at 1:10 am He was the first priest to whom I confessed my spiritual doubts and personal pains and difficulties as a young teen-aged girl some 36 years ago, when he, as a very young man, served at Saint Thomas’s Episcopal Church in Manhattan. When he was re-assigned to serve in the mid-west, never to return to NYC, I missed him tremendously. He was a fine man with great moral integrity and a totally dedicated brother. I was so happy when just two years ago, I sent him a Christmas card, in which I wrote an update of my life directly to his Chicago location. He wrote me back, overjoyed- thanking me for my letter and telling me of how he had never forgotten me. He also mentioned that he had “health problems”, but I hoped that he was going to be alright. I now know that I have lost one of the greatest friends I ever had. Posted Oct 8, 2014 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Events Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group October 17, 2014 at 5:55 pm Interesting that he and Fr. Andrew died a few days apart. Two great priests! Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Monique Emilyne Thomas says: last_img read more

Conference brings together human rights ombudsmen, Anglican and Episcopal bishops

first_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET By Lynette Wilson Posted Nov 30, 2015 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Collierville, TN Tags Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR George F. Woodward III says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing Anglican and Episcopal bishops from across Central America along with human rights ombudsman and their representatives, attended a two-day conference in San Salvador, El Salvador, on forced migration, internal displacement, human trafficking and modern slavery. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENS[Episcopal News Service – San Salvador, El Salvador] As Syrian refugees continue to risk death embarking on a dangerous journey to Europe in search of a better life, Central Americans forcibly displaced by an ongoing social conflict in the Northern Triangle also are fleeing, traveling both north and south in search of safety.The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees last month warned of the “looming refugee crisis” emanating from Central America.The region’s ongoing forced migration and internal displacement were two topics discussed during a Nov. 23-24 conference in San Salvador on forced migration, human trafficking and new forms of slavery in Central America. Representatives and ombudsmen from the region’s human rights ombudsmen offices, nongovernment and civil society organizations, and Anglican and Episcopal bishops attended the conference. During the conference the bishops also took the first step in creating a regional Anglican commission on human rights.El Salvador Bishop David Alvarado led a prayer during a Nov. 24 webinar coordinated by the Anglican Alliance, which co-sponsored, along with the American Friends Service Committee, the two-day conference on forced migration, internal displacement, human trafficking and modern slavery. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceThe Anglican Alliance and the American Friends Service Committee sponsored the two-day conference held at the InterContinental Hotel and organized by Foundation Cristosal, an organization rooted in the Anglican and Episcopal churches committed to defending and advocating for human rights.“The conference was something that Cristosal proposed because of the work we are doing on forced displacement,” said Executive Director Noah Bullock, adding that forced displacement isn’t a problem confined to the Northern Triangle countries of Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador.Foundation Cristosal has worked to establish legal precedents for the protection of victims displaced by violence in El Salvador, provides shelter and protection for victims and is working to build regional resettlement capacity.In addition to those seeking asylum in the United States, in the last two years asylum claims initiated mainly by Salvadorans and Hondurans in Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama have increased by 1,200 percent.“And the trend will likely continue to increase,” he said, adding that bringing bishops together with human rights advocates presented an opportunity to share expertise and create alliances aimed at influencing public policy and responding to emergency humanitarian needs.“The region is not prepared to receive an influx of refugees. Leadership  needs to be assumed on the issue and Cristosal has been positioned well to work with the council of ombudsmen and some of the other networks in the region to open the door for the church to fill that leadership void.”As Anglicans and Episcopalians, “we are obligated to fight for justice and peace in all communities and respect the dignity of every human being,” said Honduras Bishop Lloyd Allen, who during the meeting already had initiated a conversation to begin to address the issue with his diocese back home. “We cannot close our eyes to the abuse.”The Episcopal and Anglican churches are present in the three Northern Triangle countries: The Diocese of Honduras belongs to Province IX of The Episcopal Church, and the dioceses of Guatemala and El Salvador belong to the Anglican Church of the Central Region of America, known by its Spanish acronym, IARCA.The crisis in Central America briefly held the world’s attention in the summer of 2014, when record numbers of unaccompanied minors and women traveling with children surrendered to authorities at U.S.-Mexico border. Episcopal churches responded to the immediate crisis, and more recently General Convention passed a resolution in support of the rights of refugees and acknowledging the continued violence against and displacement of citizens in Central America.Vulnerable communities across the region suffer casualties due to violence at a level on par with conflicts raging in other parts of the world, according to studies. In the first seven months of this year, more than 4,000 Salvadorans were murdered, and on one single day in August, 52 people were killed. In Honduras, the number in the first six months was estimated at 2,720 and in Guatemala, the largest of the Northern Triangle countries, 4,261 people had been assassinated between January and September.“El Salvador and Honduras compete with Syria in terms of death rates,” said Bullock, who stressed the lack of durable solutions. “There really are no options for (these) people who flee one of the most violent, deadly conflicts in the world.”In El Salvador alone, an estimated 289,000 people are internally displaced, whereas in Honduras, a conservative estimate puts the number at 170,000. In Guatemala, the number is closer to 250,000 people.Of the three Northern Triangle countries, only Honduras has recognized the existence of forced displacement, establishing a national commission to study and document cases.“Displacement as a form of violence cannot be ignored,” said Ricardo Lopez, who works in human rights ombudsman’s office in Honduras. “If people have received threats, (the threats) will be carried out … our streets are full of blood.”In addition to bishops and ombudsmen, representatives of UNHCR, the International Organization for Migration and the International Committee of the Red Cross, which left El Salvador following the end of the civil war but returned in recent years, were present at the conference.Last year marked the 30th anniversary of the Cartagena Declaration, which amended the 1951 refugee convention and the 1967 protocol definition of what it means to be a refugee: “persons who have fled their country because their lives, safety or freedom have been threatened by generalized violence, foreign aggression, internal conflicts, massive violation of human rights or other circumstances which have seriously disturbed public order.”The countries of Central America and Mexico adopted the protocol, which was not recognized by the United States, at a time when both Guatemala and El Salvador were fighting civil wars and when Contra rebels were fighting the Sandinista government in Nicaragua.In December 2014, Latin American adopted the Brazil Declaration to address the region’s new displacement trends. The declaration aims to end statelessness by 2024, building upon previous actions to strengthen international protection of refugees in Latin America.“The problems aren’t just the problem of one country; they are shared regionally,” said Guatemala Bishop Armando Guerra. “It needs the attention of all of us.”In some ways, the high levels of societal violence in the Northern Triangle are a legacy of the civil wars of the 20th century. More than 200,000 civilians were killed during Guatemala’s 36-year civil war and 75,000 people were killed in El Salvador’s 12-year conflict between the military-led government and left-wing guerilla groups. Although Honduras didn’t have its own civil war, it felt the ramifications of regional conflicts, and was a base for the U.S.-backed Contras fighting in Nicaragua from 1979 to 1990.Foundation Cristosal Executive Director Noah Bullocks gathers bishops including, counterclockwise from him, Guatemala Bishop Armando Guerra, Panama Bishop Julio Murray, Honduras Bishop Lloyd Allen, Costa Rica Bishop Hector Monterroso, El Salvador Bishop Juan David Alvarado and Jose Lopez, a human rights lawyer for the Diocese of El Salvador. Photo: Elmer RomeroThe problem of forced migration in the Northern Triangle is a result of violence, said El Salvador Bishop David Alvarado, adding that the violence itself is part of the larger, structural problems including poverty, limited economic opportunities, access to education, healthcare and other social problems.“We are still recovering from the civil war and today we have problems with youth and gangs,” he said.In the 20-year period following signing of the peace accords, 100,000 Salvadorans have been killed, more than during the civil war, and today some 70,000 people are reported to be gang members. In Honduras, the number of gang members is estimated at 116,000 and in Guatemala, the largest of the three countries, an estimated 14,000 people belong to gangs and another 30,000 are counted as gang sympathizers.The gangs control territory through violence, including murder and rape, and extortion. Young males, particularly, are coerced into joining gangs. Refusal to join can be interpreted as expressing loyalty to a rival gang, and the uninitiated become a target for murder. Women and young girls often are taken as “girlfriends” of gang members, and often suffer rape and other forms of sexual violence as they are shared among the gang members.It’s in this context that people are fleeing; moreover, a UNHCR survey of women detained at the U.S.-Mexico border determined that of the tens of thousands of women seeking protection, a large percentage had significant protection claims under the Convention against Torture.Before a person crosses an international border, however, they’ve likely suffered internal displacement, first to another family’s home.“This is a phenomenon that primarily affects poor people so usually the move (is) from one poor household to another poor household that’s likely controlled by a different gang or the same gang,” said Bullock. “Their presence in the territory is detected within two or three days, and so then they are obligated to move again and again until the resources run out. When they make the decision to leave the country they hide, because they are going irregularly to the United States or somewhere else.”“What the victims say constantly to us is that ‘in these conditions I cannot develop as a human being.’ When you are being persecuted and your life is controlled when your life is threatened, you don’t get to develop, you don’t have opportunities and you leave to find them.”Bullock has begun framing a response to the refugee and internal displacement crisis as a “preferential option for the victim,” and ultimately the bishops concluded the church’s witness is to respond to the needs of people in their communities and to welcome the stranger.In Costa Rica, for example, where 15-20 percent of the population is foreign-born, mainly Nicaraguans looking for economic opportunities, the church provides assistance to mothers and their children, 90 percent of them migrants, through two schools it operates in the capital, said Costa Rica Bishop Hector Monterroso.It’s important not only that the church responds to human need, but that it also works to raise awareness around forced migration, said Panama Bishop Julio Murray. This is why a regional Anglican commission on human rights is being formulated, in connection with the countries’ human rights commissions.“The strategic purpose is that if we are going to form an Anglican body, we should form it with good, strong connections with other human rights bodies – and in this case it was specifically the ombudsmen, which are autonomous state entities,” said Bullock.“It’s a good fit because the ombudsmen can do the technical work around human rights, they can make public policy and do advocacy,” he said. “And the churches, they can make an appeal to people, to change the people, so that policy isn’t empty, that there’s actually a social change that is backing it and so it might be real, and that’s important.”– Lynette Wilson is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. Press Release Service Rector Knoxville, TN Julie Gurley says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Immigration, Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls Anglican Communion, Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Albany, NY November 30, 2015 at 8:32 pm I give thanks for our faithful brothers and sisters who continue to labor for human rights, decade after decade. I add my prayers and my preaching to your efforts. Comments are closed. Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Martie Metzler says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Refugees Migration & Resettlement Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Comments (3) Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem January 5, 2016 at 5:12 am Ms. Wilson is ever incisive, perceptive…and on the right stories!The Rev’d Canon George F. Woodward IIISt. Edmund’s, San Marino Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 December 8, 2015 at 5:21 pm It’s not enough to form commissions and alliances. Something concrete has to be done now to protect young girls and women, to stop the violence and displacement. Something concrete has to be done to give women, gang members, and other human beings an opportunity to be productive citizens in their countries. Schools need to be open for everyone. People need to not only run away from something horrible but to be able to run towards something valued, something they can strive for, and something that governments must provide. Having part time security and military everywhere in Central America is not going to solve the problems. All churches could work on respecting all differences in people, including Gay, Lesbian, Trans gendered or other variant types of people. Get rid of sexism, machismo exploitation and and homophobias. All countries in this area must now provide educational opportunities at the highest levels so all citizens of these countries can make contributions to society that will pay off for all citizens. Maize farming is not adequate. People need realistic hope not prayers for a better life in heaven, but a better life for themselves and their children in this world. Stop the hopelessness epidemic. The US is part of the problem and likely only a minor part of the solution. Do you want your Central American citizens to work as maids, slaves in the agricultural fields, to stand alongside of fences in large cities hoping for day labor jobs and more exploitation? No!!! Put people to work building potable water works so everyone has toxins and bacterial free water to drink. Put people to work building sewer lines and treatment plants for waste. Put people to work cleaning up the filth lying around in all the villages of plastics that are created by the multinational bottling corporations for their sugared drinks. Put people to work cleaning up the place. Get rid of US supplied weapons in the population. Don’t wait! You can do this. Rector Smithfield, NC Submit an Event Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Conference brings together human rights ombudsmen, Anglican and Episcopal bishops Bishops move toward creating a regional human rights commission Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Shreveport, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Events Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

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