Month: August 2019 Page 1 of 17

Plugless Power soon to arrive for electric and hybrid vehicles

first_img(PhysOrg.com) — Evatran, a company from Virginia in the US, has developed a working prototype of a plugless induction charger for electric and hybrid vehicles, and demonstrated the system at this week’s Plug In conference in San Jose, California. Smart Charger Controller simplifies electric vehicle recharging (w/Video) More information: www.pluglesspower.com/ To recharge a vehicle’s battery using the system, the vehicle parks at a Plugless Power station over a floor-mounted parking block, which automatically aligns itself with a special adapter fitted to the vehicle and begins charging. There is no flow of electricity between the vehicle and parking block and no plugs or cables. The system operates by electrical induction, which is the principle behind the electrical transformer. In this process electrical current flowing into a primary source produces a flow of current into a secondary source, without using plugs or cords. Induction charging provides the convenience of wireless “hands-free” charging, but the down side is that power loss during charging can reach 20 percent. Evatron says the system is 80 percent efficient at the moment, but hopes to reach 90 percent efficiency by the time production units are released.The system has three major components: an adapter fitted on the vehicle, a parking block, which is a long flat pad on the ground underneath the vehicle at the charging station or in the garage, and a control tower plugged into the grid. Essentially, the adapter and parking block form two separated halves of an electrical transformer.The vehicle adapter and parking block both contain metal coils. When a vehicle parks over the block the coils inside the block move under the guidance of magnetic sensors until they are aligned to within 6-8 cm of the coils in the adapter. The tower converts mains electricity into the correct frequency for the charger to use. When the coils are lined up, electricity in the control tower creates a strong magnetic field in the coils in the parking block, and this induces an electrical current to flow in the coils in the vehicle adapter to charge the batteries.Induction chargers have been used in portable devices such as mobile phones and electric toothbrushes, and for medical implants, but this is the first time such a system has been tried for electric and hybrid vehicles. Evatran’s corporate trade show video. A pilot program will run during 2010, and the final version is expected to be released in April next year. Evatron is inviting pioneer electric and hybrid vehicle owners to join in their field trials. Citation: Plugless Power soon to arrive for electric and hybrid vehicles (2010, July 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-07-plugless-power-electric-hybrid-vehicles.html © 2010 PhysOrg.com Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

New carbon nanotube struructure aerographite is lightest material champ

first_img(Phys.org) — Despite having a reputation for valuing intellectual prowess over physical abilities, scientists are nonetheless just as competitive as anyone else. Evidence of it exists in various fields of science as suggested by the assorted prizes that are awarded for those who achieve firsts in their particular realm of research. Also always popular are virtual contests to see who can create the smallest thing, or the largest, on in the case of aerographite, the lightest. This latest champion has been produced by a team of researchers at the University of Kiel in Germany. It’s based on carbon nanotubes and is being heralded as the lightest solid ever created. Overview of different Aerographite morphologies by controlled derivations of synthesis. Image from Adv. Mater., 24: 3486-3490. Citation: New carbon nanotube struructure aerographite is lightest material champ (2012, July 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-07-carbon-nanotube-struructure-aerographite-lightest.html Previous champions, aerogel, and then metallic microlattice were praised in their day for not just being the lightest stuff around, but for being strong for its size as well. Aerographite beats them both in both categories. Not only is it less dense (0.2 milligrams per cubic centimeter compared to 0.9) but it’s stronger too, able to support over 40,000 times its own weight. And since it’s actually mostly air (99.99%) it can be crumpled down to almost nothing if need be because it will spring back to its originally shape without prodding. Because the new champion is four times lighter than the previous champ, researchers will be busy looking for applications for it. The current hope is that because it’s a good conductor of electricity, it can be used as an electrode in new kinds of batteries or perhaps in supercapacitors.The researchers created the new material by implementing a new kind of single-step CVD synthesis process based on freely adjustable networks using zinc oxide as a template, which in essence means, they found a new way to make the graphite grow in ways that develop into very thin strand hollow carbon nanotube structures that hold together to form a new kind of material.Interestingly, the team says that if enough of the material were made to allow it to be seen by the naked eye, which they say they can do, it would appear as a black clump of sponge-like material. They also note that they didn’t start out trying to invent a new material but found it came naturally as part of their research into three-dimensionally cross-linked carbon structures. Explore further More information: Mecklenburg, M., Schuchardt, A., Mishra, Y. K., Kaps, S., Adelung, R., Lotnyk, A., Kienle, L. and Schulte, K. (2012), Aerographite: Ultra Lightweight, Flexible Nanowall, Carbon Microtube Material with Outstanding Mechanical Performance. Adv. Mater., 24: 3486–3490. doi: 10.1002/adma.201200491AbstractAn ultra lightweight carbon microtube material called Aerographite is synthesized by a novel single-step chemical vapor deposition synthesis based on ZnO networks, which is presently the lightest known material with a density smaller than μg/cm3. Despite its low density, the hierarchical design leads to remarkable mechanical, electrical, and optical properties. The first experiments with Aerographite electrodes confirm its applicability. U.S. team creates diamond aerogel in lab by emulating Mother Nature © 2012 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Modern pigs found to have more wild boar genes than thought

first_imgDomestic pig. Credit: Scott Bauer, USDA (Phys.org)—An international team of researchers has found that domesticated pigs in Europe have a lot more wild boar in them than has been thought. In their paper published in Nature Genetics, the team describes their genetic survey of a large number of domesticated pigs and wild boars in both Europe and Asia. © 2015 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. More information: Evidence of long-term gene flow and selection during domestication from analyses of Eurasian wild and domestic pig genomes, Nature Genetics (2015) DOI: 10.1038/ng.3394AbstractTraditionally, the process of domestication is assumed to be initiated by humans, involve few individuals and rely on reproductive isolation between wild and domestic forms. We analyzed pig domestication using over 100 genome sequences and tested whether pig domestication followed a traditional linear model or a more complex, reticulate model. We found that the assumptions of traditional models, such as reproductive isolation and strong domestication bottlenecks, are incompatible with the genetic data. In addition, our results show that, despite gene flow, the genomes of domestic pigs have strong signatures of selection at loci that affect behavior and morphology. We argue that recurrent selection for domestic traits likely counteracted the homogenizing effect of gene flow from wild boars and created ‘islands of domestication’ in the genome. Our results have major ramifications for the understanding of animal domestication and suggest that future studies should employ models that do not assume reproductive isolation. Citation: Modern pigs found to have more wild boar genes than thought (2015, September 1) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-09-modern-pigs-wild-boar-genes.htmlcenter_img China genes stopped Euro-pigs from being total boars Journal information: Nature Genetics The modern pig has become an icon of sorts, providing food and entertainment and sometimes fodder for jokes—but its origins appear to differ from what scientists have assumed for most of modern history—namely that pigs were domesticated approximately 9000 years ago and have been kept separate from their wild cousins, leading to the different-looking creature so familiar to us today.In this new study, the researchers started out by collecting samples from 600 pigs and boars from a variety of locations in Europe and Asia, they then focused on a subset of those, eventually testing 103 whole genomes. Next, they combined their results with those from a prior study that had done a less through analysis on an additional 600 wild and domesticated pigs. To trace the lineage of the animals, the team conducted a Bayesian computation analyses, focusing on gene flow—which led to the development of models to describe the history of both pigs and boars.In studying their data and models, the researchers concluded that modern pigs are not the result of isolated breeding, but instead are the result of cross breeding between domesticated pigs and wild boars over the span of many years—and some of those boar genes were not in the dataset at all, which suggest they might have been from a now extinct species. The data also supports the theory that pigs were actually first domesticated in two places, Asia and the Middle East. Pigs in Europe, the analysis indicates, first came from the Middle East, then were mixed with wild boars, and then were mixed again with pigs from Asia, resulting in what the researchers call the mutts of today.As for why modern domesticated pigs do not look much like wild hogs, the researchers suggest it is due to selective breeding by early farmers—they tended to mate pigs with others that had traits they desired, which might have led to what they deem “islands of domestication” which favored many traits in spite of the occasional cross-breeding with wild hogs. Explore furtherlast_img read more

Preliminary results of Breakthrough Listen project released

first_img Explore further The Breakthrough Listen project was publicly announced in 2015, and has been backed by Stephen Hawking and perhaps more importantly by Yuri Milner, a Russian billionaire who, along with other backers, has put $100 million toward the 10-year project. Over the past two years, the Parkes Telescope in Australia, the Green Bank Telescope in the U.S. and the Automated Planet Finder optical telescope at Lick Observatory also in the U.S. have been dedicated to listening to radio signals emanating from space in the hope that one or more of them might be generated by alien life forms. Several petabytes of data have been collected after pointing the telescopes at 692 stars—each gets three five-minute observations, which are interspersed with observations of other targets. Thus far, the team has designated 1709 stars for study. The team has also broken down the stars to be studied into two categories: those within 16 light years of the sun, and those belonging to a sample spread across a main sequence and some branch stars which are no more than 163 light years away.Project members made headlines last year when they noticed irregular dimming by Tabby’s Star—subsequent study suggested that rather than indicating signs of extraterrestrial life, the dimming was most likely caused by comet fragments interrupting signals.The team reports that to date, project members have identified 11 signals as worthy of a closer look, but at this time, do not believe any of the signals represent alien communications. They also note that the process of sifting the data is rather simple and straightforward—first, distinguish artificial signals from natural signals by looking at irregular behavior such as modulation or pulsing patterns. The next step involves making sure any such irregularities are not generated here on Earth. The software is open source so that anyone who wishes to participate in the search can do so. © 2017 Phys.org Journal information: Astrophysical Journal Breakthrough Listen to search for intelligent life around weird star This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Preliminary results of Breakthrough Listen project released (2017, April 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-04-preliminary-results-breakthrough.html More information: Breakthrough Listen: breakthroughinitiatives.org/News/10seti.berkeley.edu/lband2017/index.html (Phys.org)—The team of researchers working on the Breakthrough Listen project (based at the University of California, Berkeley SETI Research Center) has released preliminary findings after sifting through several petabytes of data obtained from three telescopes involved in the research project. The findings have been made available on the project’s website as the team awaits publication of a paper in the Astrophysical Journal.last_img read more

Redefine statistical significance Large group of scientists statisticians argue for changing pvalue

first_img(Phys.org)—A large group of scientists and statisticians has uploaded a paper to the PsyArXiv preprint server arguing for changing the p-value from .05 to .005. The paper outlines their reasons for suggesting that the commonly used value for assigning significance to results be changed. Relationship between the P-value threshold, power, and the false positive rate. Credit: PsyArXiv, 22 July 2017. More information: Benjamin, Daniel J et al. “Redefine Statistical Significance”. PsyArXiv, 22 July 2017. Web. dx.doi.org/10.17605/OSF.IO/MKY9J Some science is cut and dried: If you drop a ball from a tower, for example, it will fall to the ground under normal circumstances. Unfortunately, a lot of other science is not nearly so definitive—the science of investigating, producing and using pharmaceuticals, for example. Not all drugs work as expected in all people under all conditions. Uncertainty is prevalent in many areas, including astronomy, physics and economics. Because of this, the scientific community has settled on a means for obtaining the p-value that offers a measure of an experiment’s success. Different p-values mean different things, of course, but the most prominent is the one that represents what has come to be known as statistical significance, which has historically been set at .05. But now, this new paper suggests that the bar has been set too low, and is therefore contributing to the problem of irreproducible findings in research efforts.One of the main problems with the p-value, some in the statistics field have suggested, is that non-statisticians do not really understand it and because of that, use it incorrectly. It cannot be used, for example, to declare that a new drug has a 95 percent chance of working if it is used in the prescribed way. It is also not a way of interpreting how true something is, they note. Instead, it is defined as the probability of an outcome when conducting a test that is equal to or “more extreme” than the result if the null hypothesis (nothing happened) is true.But even when it is used correctly, it does not offer a strong enough measure of evidence, according to the authors. Thus, they suggest changing the p-value to .005. They claim doing so would reduce the rate of false positives from the current 33 percent down to 5 percent. One reason so many scientific studies may be wrong Citation: Redefine statistical significance: Large group of scientists, statisticians argue for changing p-value from .05 to .005 (2017, August 1) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-08-redefine-statistical-significance-large-group.html Explore further © 2017 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Quantum dots found to reduce fibrils in Parkinsons mouse models

first_imgTEM images of preformed α-syn fibrils at various time points (6 and 12 h, 1, 3 and 7 days) in the absence (top) and presence (bottom) of GQDs. Credit: Nature Nanotechnology (2018). DOI: 10.1038/s41565-018-0179-y A large team of researchers with members from several institutions in the U.S., Korea and Japan has found that injecting quantum dots into the bloodstreams of mice led to a reduction in fibrils associated with Parkinson’s disease. In their paper published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, the group describes their studies of the impact of quantum dots made of graphene on synuclein and what they found. © 2018 Medical Xpress Explore further Citation: Quantum dots found to reduce fibrils in Parkinson’s mouse models (2018, July 10) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-07-quantum-dots-fibrils-parkinson-mouse.html More information: Donghoon Kim et al. Graphene quantum dots prevent α-synucleinopathy in Parkinson’s disease, Nature Nanotechnology (2018). DOI: 10.1038/s41565-018-0179-yAbstractThough emerging evidence indicates that the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease is strongly correlated to the accumulation1,2 and transmission3,4 of α-synuclein (α-syn) aggregates in the midbrain, no anti-aggregation agents have been successful at treating the disease in the clinic. Here, we show that graphene quantum dots (GQDs) inhibit fibrillization of α-syn and interact directly with mature fibrils, triggering their disaggregation. Moreover, GQDs can rescue neuronal death and synaptic loss, reduce Lewy body and Lewy neurite formation, ameliorate mitochondrial dysfunctions, and prevent neuron-to-neuron transmission of α-syn pathology provoked by α-syn preformed fibrils5,6. We observe, in vivo, that GQDs penetrate the blood–brain barrier and protect against dopamine neuron loss induced by α-syn preformed fibrils, Lewy body/Lewy neurite pathology and behavioural deficits.center_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Gold changes photoluminescence of silicon quantum dots Quantum dots are particles that exist at the nanoscale and are made of semiconducting materials. Because they exhibit quantum properties, scientists have been conducting experiments to learn more about changes they cause to organisms when embedded in their cells. In this new effort, the researchers became interested in the idea of embedding quantum dots in synuclein cells.Synucleins make up a group or family of proteins and are typically found in neural tissue. One type, an alpha-synuclein, has been found to be associated with the formation of fibrils as part of the development of Parkinson’s disease. To see how such a protein might react when exposed to quantum dots, the researchers combined the two in a petri dish and watched what happened. They found that the quantum dots became bound to the protein, and in so doing, prevented it from clumping into fibrils. They also found that doing so after fibrils had already formed caused them to come apart. Impressed with their findings, the team pushed their research further.Noting that quantum dots are small enough to pass through the blood/brain barrier, they injected quantum dots into mice with induced Parkinson’s disease and monitored them for several months. They report that after six months, the mice showed improvements in symptoms.The researchers suggest that quantum dots might have a similar impact on multiple ailments where fibrilization occurs, noting that another team had found that injecting them into Alzheimer’s mouse models produced similar results.It is still not known if injecting similar or different types of quantum dots into human patients might have the same effect, they note. Nor is it known if doing so would have any undesirable side effects. Still, the researchers are optimistic about the idea of using quantum dots for treatment of such diseases and because of that, have initiated plans for testing with other animals—and down the road they are looking at the possibility of conducting clinical trials in humans. Journal information: Nature Nanotechnologylast_img read more

Of Blues and the Lizard King

first_imgLovers of Jim Morrison will have one more reason to celebrate on 8 December. Besides raising a toast to the rockstar on his 69th birth anniversary, a band called Morrison Blues performing classic hits of the legend to bring to life his iconic charisma.Morrison Blues, as the name suggests, is deeply influenced by The Doors. The two-man band has Nipun Sachdeva leading with vocals and the guitar and Yatin Sharma accompanies with the drums.‘Jim Morrison is a legacy that continues to transcend generations. We will be playing cover to The Door as a tribute to the legendary band on his birthday eve,’ said the band. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Morrison Blues born in July this year is still a baby in the Delhi band circuit but they continue to impress audiences with their covers of  popular songs of The Doors and Morrison.‘Both of us have been together since school and a common passion for music brought us together. We used to play for different bands but got together later to celebrate rock music and perform it,’ said Nipun Sachdeva.‘Music for us is an altogether different world. It is a shadowy realm of dreams where there are no compromises. It personifies freedom,’ added the 27 year old. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixTheir band name signifies their love and passion for two things – the Blues and Jim Morrison.‘We are highly inspired by the metaphorical lyrics and persona of Morrison. His songs, poetry and compositions have an uncanny mesmerising essence to it,’ said Nipun.‘There is a lot of competition in the band circuit. But I believe that if you get a trip out of your music and enjoy it, so will the audience,’ said Nipun.So has this fledgeling band faced any challenges till now? ‘We have been really lucky to had our parents support throughout, but they were always clear about the fact that we can continue with our music until we find a concrete full fledged well paid job,’ said  Nipun.Till then they will continue to pay their tributes to Morrison and Blues for life.DETAILAt: Cafe Morrison, South ExWhen: 8 DecemberTimings: 9 pm onwardslast_img read more

RPF announces dates of online recruitment examination

first_imgKolkata: The Central Recruitment Committee (CRC) of RPF announced that it would start the Recruitment 2018 Online Examination (Group A to F) from Wednesday, December 19, 2018. About seventy three lakhs candidates are expected to appear for this examination across the country. The exam would be conducted on December 19, 20, 21, 22 and 23.The CRC has mentioned important instructions regarding the examination to the candidates on the admit card to ensure timely and smooth execution. Candidates appearing for the examination are advised to go through the instructions in detail and understand the do’s and don’t’s. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeThe “Practice Test” link would be made available for the candidates on the official website along with the admit card which would allow the candidates to get familiar with the computer based test (CBT). Candidates are required to carry one of the original government approved photo ID cards as instructed. Candidates without an original Photo ID Card, even if they have the admit card, will not be allowed to enter the exam venue. Candidates are advised to note that mobile phones, pager, watches, bluetooth-enabled devices, calculators, metallic wears, bangles, belts, bracelets or any RF device etc, will not be allowed inside the examination centre. They are advised to ensure that they do not have mehendi or henna on left Thumb as it may create difficulties in capturing the Biometric data during registration process. The self-declaration paragraph will be displayed on the computer screen before start of the exam. All the candidates are required to write the same in the space provided in the admit card in the examination hall itself.last_img read more

11 arrested including spa manager for running sleaze racket

first_imgKOLKATA: A sleaze racket has been busted by the city police on Thursday night and as many as 11 persons including some women have been arrested for their alleged involvement.Acting on a tip-off, the Anti-Women Trafficking department of the city police raided an apartment under Karaya police station and arrested the accused. The sleaze racket was operating in the guise of Spa centre. Among the arrested, there were some sex workers, a woman manager of the Spa, some touts and customers. Police had received a complaint from locals saying certain ‘illegal’ activities were taking place inside the Spa for quite some time. On the basis of the information, police raided it on Thursday night. They are trying to know the names of others involved in the racket. Some of the policemen went to the flat and caught the accused. Police have started a case under the Immoral Trafficking Act. They are conducting raids to nab the other culprits. Locals informed police that people used to visit the place throughout the day. Initially, they thought it to be a Spa centre operating at the apartment and could never realise that a sleaze racket was active. However, locals smelled a rat and reported the matter to the local police. During the preliminary investigation police came to know that the manager used to operate the sleaze racket. A detailed probe has been initiated in this regard. Cops have also come to know that the sex workers who have been arrested, aged between 21 and 27, used to visit the Spa on a regular basis. They are being interrogated in detail.last_img read more

First International Print Biennale to be held in India

first_imgKeeping in mind the passion and the intimacy of print as a visual art medium, The Lalit Kala Akademi, has launched its first International Print Biennale to discover new artistic trends in printmaking, nationally and internationally. The Akademi has been serving the entire country by promoting the creative endeavours of Indian artists. Pivotal to the Lalit Kala Akademi’s mission is the encouragement of an ever-deeper understanding and enjoyment of modern and contemporary art before diverse local, national and international audiences. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe Print Biennale has been scheduled for the month of March and April 2018, in the Lalit Kala Akademi and NGMA galleries. It will be a one of a kind event where artists from all over the world will be able to send in their works and showcase their artwork on an international platform. Further, there are five grand prizes of two lakh each, apart from the honourable mentions for a few selected meritorious works. The Akademi will also hold a five-day workshop of the awarded artists. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveTalking about the decreasing practice of printmaking among the artists, C.S. Krishna Setty, Administrator, he Lalit Kala Akademi said, “Over the years, the practice of printmaking is decreasing among artists. As a result, many printmakers are taking refuge in other mediums for their survival. To arrest this situation, we need to boost this medium with international exposure. Moreover, with the advancement of new technologies, this medium has taken new dimensions all over the world, which needs to be showcased to the art fraternity and connoisseurs.” The biennale will be organized in collaboration with National Gallery of Modern Art (NGMA). Speaking of the same, Adwaita Gadanayak, DG, NGMA, said, “The museum has international facilities which will be given to the Akademi to present their best foot forward for this international endeavour. It is imperative for more and more organisations to come together and create an atmosphere of art creation and growth.”The first selection will be made based on the digital entries sent by the artists. If the work gets approved by the jury, it will be displayed during the exhibition. Later in the second round, selected artists will be asked to send their original work so that it gets easier to choose the winners. Paula Sengupta, a printmaker and teacher, mentioned that printmaking is over four centuries old and is a culmination of many years of practice. Further on, she mentioned, “The reason printmaking is alive in India is that it is still fostered in Indian art institutes and the studios that Lalit Kala Akademi has provided in its regional centers.”The Akademi will also invite few senior and veteran artists for the exhibition under the invited section. Anupam Sud, a senior and internationally known Delhi based printmaker has been given the responsibility of the Commissioner of the exhibition. Other steering Committee members are well-known printmakers like Ananda Moy Banerji, Dattatraya Apte, R.S. Sham Sunder, Paula Sen Gupta and Vijay Bagodi.last_img read more

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